13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

New Black Heart Procession albums have always been a delicate proposition, like inviting the devil over for tea or literally cracking Pandora's Box in your living room. After all, very few indie-rock vets make dreadful tales of death and damnation as palpable as the Procession. That's certainly the case here, as the band raises the curtain on a conceptual and literal continuation of their first three full-lengths. Like those sequentially numbered LPs, Six is spare but undeniably spooky, drawing most of its spine-tingling power from co-founders/multi-instrumentalists Pall Jenkins and Tobias Nathaniel. Gone — for the most part, at least — are the clanging guitars of 2006's The Spell. In their place: prickly piano progressions ("When You Finish Me," "Liar's Ink"), grimy organ rolls ("Heaven and Hell"), and speaker-panning synths, as drowned by a sea of distortion and galloping grooves ("Suicide"). None of which comes off as campy or calculated. Nope, this is pure melancholia — music that grabs you by the throat and doesn't let go until the last musty, sustained note of "Iri Sulu."

EDITORS’ NOTES

New Black Heart Procession albums have always been a delicate proposition, like inviting the devil over for tea or literally cracking Pandora's Box in your living room. After all, very few indie-rock vets make dreadful tales of death and damnation as palpable as the Procession. That's certainly the case here, as the band raises the curtain on a conceptual and literal continuation of their first three full-lengths. Like those sequentially numbered LPs, Six is spare but undeniably spooky, drawing most of its spine-tingling power from co-founders/multi-instrumentalists Pall Jenkins and Tobias Nathaniel. Gone — for the most part, at least — are the clanging guitars of 2006's The Spell. In their place: prickly piano progressions ("When You Finish Me," "Liar's Ink"), grimy organ rolls ("Heaven and Hell"), and speaker-panning synths, as drowned by a sea of distortion and galloping grooves ("Suicide"). None of which comes off as campy or calculated. Nope, this is pure melancholia — music that grabs you by the throat and doesn't let go until the last musty, sustained note of "Iri Sulu."

TITLE TIME

More By The Black Heart Procession

You May Also Like