7 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their pretty-boy looks and blue-eyed soul pedigree, Daryl Hall & John Oates were unlikely candidates to rock Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater in 1985. The fact that they were well received by the venue’s R&B audience is testament to the duo’s stage chemistry and soulfulness. Of course, it didn’t hurt that the stage show included former Temptations members Eddie Kendricks and David Ruffin. This live document begins with the ensemble running through a medley of Motown chestnuts, but Hall & Oates’ affinity for ‘60s soul music comes through more clearly on “Everytime You Go Away.” The song is a Hall & Oates original, but the support of Kendricks and Ruffin makes the listener realize it could pass for something by Holland-Dozier-Holland. The crowd eats up the pillowy hooks of “One On One” and “Possession Obsession,” but the real highlight is the seven-minute version of “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do).” Hushed in its original studio version, the song here is driven by the taut funk bass of Tom “T-Bone” Wolk. His playing would make original Motown bassist James Jamerson smile.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their pretty-boy looks and blue-eyed soul pedigree, Daryl Hall & John Oates were unlikely candidates to rock Harlem’s legendary Apollo Theater in 1985. The fact that they were well received by the venue’s R&B audience is testament to the duo’s stage chemistry and soulfulness. Of course, it didn’t hurt that the stage show included former Temptations members Eddie Kendricks and David Ruffin. This live document begins with the ensemble running through a medley of Motown chestnuts, but Hall & Oates’ affinity for ‘60s soul music comes through more clearly on “Everytime You Go Away.” The song is a Hall & Oates original, but the support of Kendricks and Ruffin makes the listener realize it could pass for something by Holland-Dozier-Holland. The crowd eats up the pillowy hooks of “One On One” and “Possession Obsession,” but the real highlight is the seven-minute version of “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do).” Hushed in its original studio version, the song here is driven by the taut funk bass of Tom “T-Bone” Wolk. His playing would make original Motown bassist James Jamerson smile.

TITLE TIME

More By Daryl Hall & John Oates

You May Also Like