6 Songs, 21 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Considering the intense volatility of their sound, New York’s art-punk trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs benefit from the compressed punch of the EP format where every note carries added weight. There’s no time to self-indulge and the band has always been at its best when surging forth with primitive soul fully exposed. Singer Karen O has grown past whatever PJ Harvey affections her earliest works supposed and she’s in complete control for the extra maelstrom of “Down Boy” where she indulges both her quieter, contemplative side and her sudden shrieks to nowhere. The band’s basic guitar / drum combo leaves little room for the extra flourish, yet guitarist Nick Zinner gets the most out of heavily distorted riffage. The new-wave strokes of “Kiss, Kiss” careen with an ebullient pop melody underneath the overdriven attack. With “Isis” the group also proves that garage rock need not lose its sex-drive come-on. Nothing wrong with a quick dose of abrasive fun.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Considering the intense volatility of their sound, New York’s art-punk trio Yeah Yeah Yeahs benefit from the compressed punch of the EP format where every note carries added weight. There’s no time to self-indulge and the band has always been at its best when surging forth with primitive soul fully exposed. Singer Karen O has grown past whatever PJ Harvey affections her earliest works supposed and she’s in complete control for the extra maelstrom of “Down Boy” where she indulges both her quieter, contemplative side and her sudden shrieks to nowhere. The band’s basic guitar / drum combo leaves little room for the extra flourish, yet guitarist Nick Zinner gets the most out of heavily distorted riffage. The new-wave strokes of “Kiss, Kiss” careen with an ebullient pop melody underneath the overdriven attack. With “Isis” the group also proves that garage rock need not lose its sex-drive come-on. Nothing wrong with a quick dose of abrasive fun.

TITLE TIME
6

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