11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grace Potter owned the role of swaggering, shouting soul-rocker in roots and jam circles for a dozen years—much of that time backed by her band The Nocturnals—before signaling that she found the role too constricting with a synthy pop-rock solo outing in 2015. She’s now taken another turn, this time toward more personalized, individualistic expression, on Daylight. Potter speaks of the 11-song collection, mostly co-written with her producer Eric Valentine and contributions from the late busbee, as the fruit of a tumultuous period of her life: divorce from a former band member; marriage to Valentine; first-time parenthood. Vintage pop, soul, and singer-songwriter forms and supple arrangements are her tools of choice for urging confrontation and cathartic honesty. During the torchy pop number “Repossession,” she conveys a prickly sentiment with smoothness, and during “Back to Me,” she challenges equivocation with a brightly orchestrated soul hook.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grace Potter owned the role of swaggering, shouting soul-rocker in roots and jam circles for a dozen years—much of that time backed by her band The Nocturnals—before signaling that she found the role too constricting with a synthy pop-rock solo outing in 2015. She’s now taken another turn, this time toward more personalized, individualistic expression, on Daylight. Potter speaks of the 11-song collection, mostly co-written with her producer Eric Valentine and contributions from the late busbee, as the fruit of a tumultuous period of her life: divorce from a former band member; marriage to Valentine; first-time parenthood. Vintage pop, soul, and singer-songwriter forms and supple arrangements are her tools of choice for urging confrontation and cathartic honesty. During the torchy pop number “Repossession,” she conveys a prickly sentiment with smoothness, and during “Back to Me,” she challenges equivocation with a brightly orchestrated soul hook.

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