12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Satellites and Sirens serve up a kind of cheeky, hyperactive Christian pop normally associated with blazing guitars—except this quartet relies on synthesizers to define their sound. The Nashville band’s sophomore album, Frequency, is a frothy but faith-centered work that bristles with driving tempos and big shout-along choruses. Singer Geoff Hunker delivers the songs with an infectious eagerness, swept along by the galloping pace of tracks like “Make a Mess,” “Let It Go," and the title number. The funkified groove of “Black Sheep” (a readymade youth anthem) and the sweet melodic sway of “Awkward” help anchor the album’s general bounciness. “Take My Hand” swirls with electronica washes, achieving a shimmering glow. Beyond the buoyancy of their music, S&S stand out for their skill at injecting serious spiritual themes into even their giddiest tunes—“Makeup,” for instance, offers a compassionate message to those beaten down by the everyday world. Praise songs like “Run to You” reaffirm the band’s convictions amid the throbbing beats and bleeps.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Satellites and Sirens serve up a kind of cheeky, hyperactive Christian pop normally associated with blazing guitars—except this quartet relies on synthesizers to define their sound. The Nashville band’s sophomore album, Frequency, is a frothy but faith-centered work that bristles with driving tempos and big shout-along choruses. Singer Geoff Hunker delivers the songs with an infectious eagerness, swept along by the galloping pace of tracks like “Make a Mess,” “Let It Go," and the title number. The funkified groove of “Black Sheep” (a readymade youth anthem) and the sweet melodic sway of “Awkward” help anchor the album’s general bounciness. “Take My Hand” swirls with electronica washes, achieving a shimmering glow. Beyond the buoyancy of their music, S&S stand out for their skill at injecting serious spiritual themes into even their giddiest tunes—“Makeup,” for instance, offers a compassionate message to those beaten down by the everyday world. Praise songs like “Run to You” reaffirm the band’s convictions amid the throbbing beats and bleeps.

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