DYNASTY

Tainy & Yandel

DYNASTY

Reggaetón boasts no shortage of two-man team-ups. For some of its most crucial formative years, particularly in the 2000s and then into the 2010s, it was almost preferred for vocalists to partner rather than go solo. “Wisin & Yandel were one of the first to give me the opportunity to listen to my music,” producer Tainy tells Apple Music. “They were legends.” Though he himself went on to become one of Latin music’s hugest hitmakers, making anthems and contemporary classics with today’s superstars like Bad Bunny and J Balvin, back then he was a fresh-faced prodigy working in what was essentially an apprentice-level capacity with the pioneering Puerto Rican production team Luny Tunes. But his relationship with Yandel “El Capitán” had an immediacy to it, the creative connection mutually apparent from the jump. “I think he saw my potential, what I could do,” Tainy says. “Feeding off of his ideas was amazing for me.”
Yandel’s recollection of their introduction, by way of the Luny Tunes-affiliated producer Nely, mirrors Tainy’s. “From the moment I met him, it was as if I had seen the future of music,” the reggaetonero says. “Right now, after 16 years, I think we are on another level.”
The arrival of DYNASTY itself isn’t all that unusual, given their continuous recording history over nearly two decades now, primarily though not exclusively on Yandel’s perreo-ready studio albums. Yet the celebratory nature surrounding the project feels akin to championship season, with the two commemorating their wins in the world of Latin music the only way they know how. “It was easy deciding that we wanted to do it,” Tainy says. “When we put out music, when we’re together, there's a certain feeling that comes out. You know we enjoy what we're doing.”
Given their tenure and stature in the genre, individually and jointly, it’s no surprise that much of DYNASTY finds the duo in reggaetón mode. They bring summery vibes and salacious intentions via “DEJA VU” and “CÁMARA LENTA,” songs that showcase their combined strengths as songwriters and dance-floor dominators. But one of the most notable things about DYNASTY is how, contrary to Latin music’s current standards, the duo deliberately limited who else got to join them on the mic. “The album could have been all features,” Tainy says. “Everybody wants to record with Yandel.” They recruit the in-demand R&B reggaetonero Rauw Alejandro for the party rocker “UNA MÁS” and SAINt JHN for the bilingual “SI TE VAS,” a veritable dancehall reggae jam. While Yandel speaks fondly of those moments, for him it’s all about what the main DYNASTY duo accomplished. “It was pure Tainy and Capitán Yandel. The combination of us felt very strong.”

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