10 Songs, 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Along with the Byrds’ Chris Hillman and CSN&Y drummer Dallas Taylor as well as legendary guitarist Al Perkins, Stephen Stills’ second (and final) album with Manassas also included Joe Walsh on slide guitar and keyboard player Bobby Whitlock from Derek & The Dominos. Although 1973’s Down the Road doesn’t often get as much love as its 1972 predecessor, any listener would be hard-pressed to tell these recording sessions apart. The low rumbling groove of “Isn’t It About Time” opens sounding tough, especially with Walsh’s snarling, distorted, electric slides. But following that tune, Hillman’s “Lies” shifts gears with an uplifting vibe that plays like a post-Parsons Burrito Brothers joined forces with Walsh’s James Gang. “Do You Remember the Americans” is another standout rooted in country rock similar to what New Riders Of The Purple Sage were doing then with The Adventures of Panama Red. Much like the preceding Manassas Stills sounds most comfortable here when found in the middle of a percussion-heavy, Latin-tinged jam — especially on the festive “Guaguanco de Vero.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Along with the Byrds’ Chris Hillman and CSN&Y drummer Dallas Taylor as well as legendary guitarist Al Perkins, Stephen Stills’ second (and final) album with Manassas also included Joe Walsh on slide guitar and keyboard player Bobby Whitlock from Derek & The Dominos. Although 1973’s Down the Road doesn’t often get as much love as its 1972 predecessor, any listener would be hard-pressed to tell these recording sessions apart. The low rumbling groove of “Isn’t It About Time” opens sounding tough, especially with Walsh’s snarling, distorted, electric slides. But following that tune, Hillman’s “Lies” shifts gears with an uplifting vibe that plays like a post-Parsons Burrito Brothers joined forces with Walsh’s James Gang. “Do You Remember the Americans” is another standout rooted in country rock similar to what New Riders Of The Purple Sage were doing then with The Adventures of Panama Red. Much like the preceding Manassas Stills sounds most comfortable here when found in the middle of a percussion-heavy, Latin-tinged jam — especially on the festive “Guaguanco de Vero.”

TITLE TIME

More By Stephen Stills

You May Also Like