19 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Pollard continues unabated in his quest to release more music than any other living performer. This 19-track collection is packed with snatches of great ideas, with “End of the Swell” clocking in at less than a minute and the longest cut (the horror-movie soundtrack–sounding “Vampire Playing a Red Piano”) finishing at almost three and a half. Pollard’s always been at his best when he doesn’t try to do too much. His greatest songs are dispensed as notebook jotting with clever hooks. The sound is satisfyingly brawny, with the drums snapping and guitars cranking without the limits of lo-fi. “Cyclopean Runways” emits a shiny britpop worthy of Robyn Hitchcock. “Legendary Breakfast Code” swoons with a pensive demeanor. “Nully Scully” throws out vocals straight from goth kings The Sisters of Mercy. “Leave the Knife Curtis” swaggers with purpose. “Double Vission” (sic) evokes feelings of intoxication. “The Matter of Being Good” attacks with precise power chords. “What Wallace?” indulges Pollard’s weird side, but “Safe on a Vegetable,” silly title aside, features a solid, alluring melody.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Pollard continues unabated in his quest to release more music than any other living performer. This 19-track collection is packed with snatches of great ideas, with “End of the Swell” clocking in at less than a minute and the longest cut (the horror-movie soundtrack–sounding “Vampire Playing a Red Piano”) finishing at almost three and a half. Pollard’s always been at his best when he doesn’t try to do too much. His greatest songs are dispensed as notebook jotting with clever hooks. The sound is satisfyingly brawny, with the drums snapping and guitars cranking without the limits of lo-fi. “Cyclopean Runways” emits a shiny britpop worthy of Robyn Hitchcock. “Legendary Breakfast Code” swoons with a pensive demeanor. “Nully Scully” throws out vocals straight from goth kings The Sisters of Mercy. “Leave the Knife Curtis” swaggers with purpose. “Double Vission” (sic) evokes feelings of intoxication. “The Matter of Being Good” attacks with precise power chords. “What Wallace?” indulges Pollard’s weird side, but “Safe on a Vegetable,” silly title aside, features a solid, alluring melody.

TITLE TIME

More By Circus Devils

You May Also Like