12 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

1968’s More Hits from Tin Can Alley was Eric Andersen’s second album to include substantial musical backing. (His first had been the unusual ’Bout Changes ’n’ Things, Take 2, where he’d rerecorded his previous all-acoustic album, ’Bout Changes ’n’ Things.) Finally working with a new lineup of songs meant to be recorded with a band, Andersen sounds far more confident and determined to keep up with the changing times. The use of Al Kooper, Bobby Gregg, Herb Lovelle, Paul Harris, and Paul Griffin (many of whom played with Bob Dylan), ensured comparisons to Dylan’s electric work. “Honey,” for certain, sounds like something off Highway 61 Revisited. But Andersen the romantic appears on “Just a Little Something” and “A Woman Is a Prism," and that's more indicative of where his music would go from here. The Phil Ochs–like baroque productions heard on “Tin Can Alley,” “16 Year Grudge," and “Mary Sunshine” are exquisite if also clearly of the period.

EDITORS’ NOTES

1968’s More Hits from Tin Can Alley was Eric Andersen’s second album to include substantial musical backing. (His first had been the unusual ’Bout Changes ’n’ Things, Take 2, where he’d rerecorded his previous all-acoustic album, ’Bout Changes ’n’ Things.) Finally working with a new lineup of songs meant to be recorded with a band, Andersen sounds far more confident and determined to keep up with the changing times. The use of Al Kooper, Bobby Gregg, Herb Lovelle, Paul Harris, and Paul Griffin (many of whom played with Bob Dylan), ensured comparisons to Dylan’s electric work. “Honey,” for certain, sounds like something off Highway 61 Revisited. But Andersen the romantic appears on “Just a Little Something” and “A Woman Is a Prism," and that's more indicative of where his music would go from here. The Phil Ochs–like baroque productions heard on “Tin Can Alley,” “16 Year Grudge," and “Mary Sunshine” are exquisite if also clearly of the period.

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