17 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It was with its 2012 EP That Old Feeling that A Rocket to the Moon hinted at a musical shift. With trace elements of its glossy emo-pop in the rearview mirror, the band drove its sound toward the twangy guitars of Nashville. Its 2013 sophomore album, Wild & Free, further realizes this change from boyish bedroom anthems to matured songwriting enveloped in a rootsy tones. “Going Out” opens with lazy pedal steel sliding over acoustic guitars that blend together like a Keith Urban tune. Frontman Nick Santino presents this genre metamorphosis quite well. Rather than affect a Southern drawl, he sings like he always has—but with a noticeable emphasis on vocal harmonies during the band's signature panoramic choruses. Santino and band handle the following ballad “First Kiss” like Music City veterans. A warm and classic country-rock sound is nicely balanced here against razor-honed pop hooks and a soaring refrain. The production is crisp and pristine without sounding overdone. The deluxe version boasts two acoustic songs and “Call It All Home,” a tune that recalls the band's wide-eyed beginnings.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

It was with its 2012 EP That Old Feeling that A Rocket to the Moon hinted at a musical shift. With trace elements of its glossy emo-pop in the rearview mirror, the band drove its sound toward the twangy guitars of Nashville. Its 2013 sophomore album, Wild & Free, further realizes this change from boyish bedroom anthems to matured songwriting enveloped in a rootsy tones. “Going Out” opens with lazy pedal steel sliding over acoustic guitars that blend together like a Keith Urban tune. Frontman Nick Santino presents this genre metamorphosis quite well. Rather than affect a Southern drawl, he sings like he always has—but with a noticeable emphasis on vocal harmonies during the band's signature panoramic choruses. Santino and band handle the following ballad “First Kiss” like Music City veterans. A warm and classic country-rock sound is nicely balanced here against razor-honed pop hooks and a soaring refrain. The production is crisp and pristine without sounding overdone. The deluxe version boasts two acoustic songs and “Call It All Home,” a tune that recalls the band's wide-eyed beginnings.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
320 Ratings

320 Ratings

Sydneyluvsnsn ,

all grown up

The country direction doesn't bother me at all, because I realize that this is them growing up and progressing. The lyrics are meaningful and the music is great. I'm proud of them.

Connorjquinn5 ,

Disappointed

I don't blame ARTTM for wanting to change up their music a little bit, because let's face it, Pop-Rock is STALE. But I think Country-type music wasn't a very good choice, in my opinion. I know they're from the south so they're just channeling their regions music, but I feel kind of alienated since I hate Country music. Overall, I'm kind of disappointed, nearly every Pop-Rock band that came out with a new Album recently hasn't been able to love up to their old albums. (All Time Low, I'm looking at you..) I was hoping ARTTM would break the trend and give us something really special, but alas, it's another every song sounds the same, boring, country album.

anthomasson ,

Too country

Too much country influence on this. Love old ARTTM.

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