9 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Power pop in the mid- to late ’70s had a number of anchors, perhaps none more solid that Tulsa’s Dwight Twilley Band. This album (their second) shows how Twilley and sweet-voiced bandmate Phil Seymour masterfully pinned suburban melancholy (especially “That I Remember”) and busted-hearted angst (“Rock and Roll 47”) to big, wonderful pop hooks influenced by The Beatles, The Kinks, and Sun Records. The chiming “Chance to Get Away” is any subdivision downer on a Saturday night, while the gentle “Sleeping” is the morning after. “Here She Comes” is the new day’s renewal. Twilley and Seymour followed up this masterpiece by each going solo.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Power pop in the mid- to late ’70s had a number of anchors, perhaps none more solid that Tulsa’s Dwight Twilley Band. This album (their second) shows how Twilley and sweet-voiced bandmate Phil Seymour masterfully pinned suburban melancholy (especially “That I Remember”) and busted-hearted angst (“Rock and Roll 47”) to big, wonderful pop hooks influenced by The Beatles, The Kinks, and Sun Records. The chiming “Chance to Get Away” is any subdivision downer on a Saturday night, while the gentle “Sleeping” is the morning after. “Here She Comes” is the new day’s renewal. Twilley and Seymour followed up this masterpiece by each going solo.

TITLE TIME