11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After insisting that the first version of her debut – a slick studio effort – be shelved, Sheryl Crow made Tuesday Night Music Club, a homemade-feeling effort that eventually catapulted her into the front ranks of mainstream rockers. The ballad “Strong Enough,” for instance, ultimately rests on a few instruments (acoustic guitar, lap steel, stand-up bass) and Crow’s full-throated cry. The album launched a row of hit singles, with “All I Wanna Do,” an adaptation of a Wyn Cooper poem, sticking the hardest, but it’s one of those discs where every piece feels like an important message from the source. Even working with a group of undeniable pros, Crow is a singer/songwriter who can see beyond her own nose. “All I Wanna Do” and “No One Said It Would Be Easy” limn working-class figures not often heard outside country or rap, while “What I Can Do for You” is a sketch of music-biz sexual harassment that could easily be the story of a woman outside the industry.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After insisting that the first version of her debut – a slick studio effort – be shelved, Sheryl Crow made Tuesday Night Music Club, a homemade-feeling effort that eventually catapulted her into the front ranks of mainstream rockers. The ballad “Strong Enough,” for instance, ultimately rests on a few instruments (acoustic guitar, lap steel, stand-up bass) and Crow’s full-throated cry. The album launched a row of hit singles, with “All I Wanna Do,” an adaptation of a Wyn Cooper poem, sticking the hardest, but it’s one of those discs where every piece feels like an important message from the source. Even working with a group of undeniable pros, Crow is a singer/songwriter who can see beyond her own nose. “All I Wanna Do” and “No One Said It Would Be Easy” limn working-class figures not often heard outside country or rap, while “What I Can Do for You” is a sketch of music-biz sexual harassment that could easily be the story of a woman outside the industry.

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