15 Songs, 1 Hour 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Rip, Rig and Panic shows Roland Kirk in search of new soundforms, stretching and contorting his saxophone in imitation of noises found in urban environments and the animal kingdom. “Slippery, Hippery, Flippery” incorporates a tape-collage technique that Kirk said was inspired by avant-garde composer Edgar Varese. The album's choices are governed by Kirk’s insatiable quest for freedom—it's no wonder that when Jimi Hendrix first traveled to London in 1966, the only record he carried was Rip, Rig, and Panic. Now Please Don’t Cry Beautiful Edith highlights Kirk’s sensitive, soulful side. His deep-throated horn was one of the era’s great voices, and his articulation of “Blue Rol” has more in common with Lou Rawls and Otis Redding than post-bop instrumentalists. Kirk’s manner of singing through his horn reaches an apex on the title song, a dedication to Kirk’s wife. A stately yet distinctive ballad, “Now Please Don’t Cry Beautiful Edith” proves once and all that it's possible to speak through music without relying on words. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Rip, Rig and Panic shows Roland Kirk in search of new soundforms, stretching and contorting his saxophone in imitation of noises found in urban environments and the animal kingdom. “Slippery, Hippery, Flippery” incorporates a tape-collage technique that Kirk said was inspired by avant-garde composer Edgar Varese. The album's choices are governed by Kirk’s insatiable quest for freedom—it's no wonder that when Jimi Hendrix first traveled to London in 1966, the only record he carried was Rip, Rig, and Panic. Now Please Don’t Cry Beautiful Edith highlights Kirk’s sensitive, soulful side. His deep-throated horn was one of the era’s great voices, and his articulation of “Blue Rol” has more in common with Lou Rawls and Otis Redding than post-bop instrumentalists. Kirk’s manner of singing through his horn reaches an apex on the title song, a dedication to Kirk’s wife. A stately yet distinctive ballad, “Now Please Don’t Cry Beautiful Edith” proves once and all that it's possible to speak through music without relying on words. 

TITLE TIME