17 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Williams punctuated a month in Abraham Lincoln's life with the grand orchestral aplomb that’s synonymous with his life’s work. But something about Williams’ chemistry with Steven Spielberg can bring a whole package to life, and fittingly, Williams’ score for 2012’s Lincoln is no exception. Right from the opening composition, “The People’s House,” there’s a familiar emotional swell of orchestral melodies soaring with triumphant bombast. “Getting Out the Vote” cleverly incorporate old-timey fiddles and Dixieland shuffles that are indicative of Lincoln's era, but Williams adds a layer of sublime orchestration to flesh out the string-band style with more dimension. Similarly, “The Race to the House” leans heavily on sepia-toned instrumentation (more than in “Getting Out the Vote”), creating a hot and humid mood to match the pastoral patina of the old American South. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Williams punctuated a month in Abraham Lincoln's life with the grand orchestral aplomb that’s synonymous with his life’s work. But something about Williams’ chemistry with Steven Spielberg can bring a whole package to life, and fittingly, Williams’ score for 2012’s Lincoln is no exception. Right from the opening composition, “The People’s House,” there’s a familiar emotional swell of orchestral melodies soaring with triumphant bombast. “Getting Out the Vote” cleverly incorporate old-timey fiddles and Dixieland shuffles that are indicative of Lincoln's era, but Williams adds a layer of sublime orchestration to flesh out the string-band style with more dimension. Similarly, “The Race to the House” leans heavily on sepia-toned instrumentation (more than in “Getting Out the Vote”), creating a hot and humid mood to match the pastoral patina of the old American South. 

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