14 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Roots have wandered down a multitude of stylistic pathways during their decade and a half long career, they've always maintained a clear and uncompromising aesthetic focus. From the expansive, organic jams of Do You Want More?!!!??!, to the more concise classicism of Things Fall Apart, to the sprawling, boldly progressive Phrenology, The Roots have stayed true to their principles of restless musical experimentation, and fiercely interrogatory, politically minded lyricism. Game Theory, The Roots’ eighth LP and their first release for Def Jam, sees Black Thought, ?uestlove and the rest of the crew continuing to refine their souled-out sound. In standout track “Take It There” a reinvigorated Black Thought rails against the development of a surveillance society, his verses surging forward on a wave of trickily syncopated live beats, while lead single “Don’t Feel Right” is an outraged slice of 21st century soul, embellished by the ominous reverberations of an abused piano. Game Theory finds The Roots galvanized by a newfound sense of political urgency, and by a welcome surfeit of musical inspiration.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Roots have wandered down a multitude of stylistic pathways during their decade and a half long career, they've always maintained a clear and uncompromising aesthetic focus. From the expansive, organic jams of Do You Want More?!!!??!, to the more concise classicism of Things Fall Apart, to the sprawling, boldly progressive Phrenology, The Roots have stayed true to their principles of restless musical experimentation, and fiercely interrogatory, politically minded lyricism. Game Theory, The Roots’ eighth LP and their first release for Def Jam, sees Black Thought, ?uestlove and the rest of the crew continuing to refine their souled-out sound. In standout track “Take It There” a reinvigorated Black Thought rails against the development of a surveillance society, his verses surging forward on a wave of trickily syncopated live beats, while lead single “Don’t Feel Right” is an outraged slice of 21st century soul, embellished by the ominous reverberations of an abused piano. Game Theory finds The Roots galvanized by a newfound sense of political urgency, and by a welcome surfeit of musical inspiration.

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