11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bandleader, songwriter, and producer Jason Quever delves ever deeper into Phil Spector wall of sound territory on Papercuts’ fourth release. A hazy blend of dream and chamber pop, Fading Parade shimmers beneath layers of reverb, dense keyboards, and intricate arrangements. The bright and poppy opener, “Do You Really Wanna Know,” is a beacon in the aural fog shrouding most of the album, and “Winter Daze” stands apart due to its comparatively sparse production and clearer separation of instruments. Mostly though, simple hypnotic riffs, lush strings, and a studio full of gorgeous gossamer effects grace album highlights “Do What You Will,” “Chills,” “White Are the Waves,” and the mesmerizing closer, “Charades.” In mood and feel, Papercuts is similar to Sub Pop label mates the Shins and Beach House in terms of gentleness and use of haunting melodies, yet with a more subtle backbeat. And though his breathy wisp of a voice is largely lost amidst the wash of sound, it’s fitting for such dreamy material. These are, after all, songs to get lost in.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bandleader, songwriter, and producer Jason Quever delves ever deeper into Phil Spector wall of sound territory on Papercuts’ fourth release. A hazy blend of dream and chamber pop, Fading Parade shimmers beneath layers of reverb, dense keyboards, and intricate arrangements. The bright and poppy opener, “Do You Really Wanna Know,” is a beacon in the aural fog shrouding most of the album, and “Winter Daze” stands apart due to its comparatively sparse production and clearer separation of instruments. Mostly though, simple hypnotic riffs, lush strings, and a studio full of gorgeous gossamer effects grace album highlights “Do What You Will,” “Chills,” “White Are the Waves,” and the mesmerizing closer, “Charades.” In mood and feel, Papercuts is similar to Sub Pop label mates the Shins and Beach House in terms of gentleness and use of haunting melodies, yet with a more subtle backbeat. And though his breathy wisp of a voice is largely lost amidst the wash of sound, it’s fitting for such dreamy material. These are, after all, songs to get lost in.

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