16 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Say what you will about Jim Jones, but he knows his ground and holds it hard. Following both 2018’s Wasted Talent (his first album in seven years) and a reunion with the Diplomats, El Capo is—in the mold of Pray IV Reign or Hustler’s P.O.M.E.—a gritty, flashy, satisfyingly dramatic shot of New York street rap, right down to the soul-inflected sound of longtime Dipset producers The Heatmakerz. “I think my critics need to hear this,” Jones raps at the outset of “State of the Union.” “Or anyone who doubts my political awareness/I’m what you call a democratic with an automatic.” Elsewhere, we get treated to features from a host of New York legends, from Fat Joe (“NYC”) and Fabolous (the simmering, disco-ish “Nothing Lasts”) to Jadakiss (“Don’t Know What They Took Him For”) and, of course, Cam’ron (“Pity in the Summer”).

EDITORS’ NOTES

Say what you will about Jim Jones, but he knows his ground and holds it hard. Following both 2018’s Wasted Talent (his first album in seven years) and a reunion with the Diplomats, El Capo is—in the mold of Pray IV Reign or Hustler’s P.O.M.E.—a gritty, flashy, satisfyingly dramatic shot of New York street rap, right down to the soul-inflected sound of longtime Dipset producers The Heatmakerz. “I think my critics need to hear this,” Jones raps at the outset of “State of the Union.” “Or anyone who doubts my political awareness/I’m what you call a democratic with an automatic.” Elsewhere, we get treated to features from a host of New York legends, from Fat Joe (“NYC”) and Fabolous (the simmering, disco-ish “Nothing Lasts”) to Jadakiss (“Don’t Know What They Took Him For”) and, of course, Cam’ron (“Pity in the Summer”).

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