13 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While it displays its author’s trademark atmospherics in abundance, For the Beauty of Wynona is a much more direct album than its predecessors. While Daniel Lanois is rightly famous for being able to generate melodies and rhythms from nothing more than the moisture in the air, songs like “Brother L.A.,” “Still Learning How to Crawl,” and “Lotta Love to Give” have a grit and propulsion that was a new look for Lanois. Rather than construct songs in layers, as one might paint on canvas, Lanois worked with a live band for Wynona, which gives the performances an old-fashioned spontaneity. As always, Lanois’ past collaborators left their mark on this work, and in the songs one hears reflections of U2 (“Waiting”), Bob Dylan (“Rocky World,” “The Unbreakable Chain”), and The Neville Brothers (“Indian Red”). At the foundation is American roots music: folk, country, and blues. The pleasure of Wynona is the way it combines otherworldly ambiance with the pared-down song structures of R&B, generating standouts like “The Messenger,” “Death of a Train,” and “Sleeping in the Devil’s Bed.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

While it displays its author’s trademark atmospherics in abundance, For the Beauty of Wynona is a much more direct album than its predecessors. While Daniel Lanois is rightly famous for being able to generate melodies and rhythms from nothing more than the moisture in the air, songs like “Brother L.A.,” “Still Learning How to Crawl,” and “Lotta Love to Give” have a grit and propulsion that was a new look for Lanois. Rather than construct songs in layers, as one might paint on canvas, Lanois worked with a live band for Wynona, which gives the performances an old-fashioned spontaneity. As always, Lanois’ past collaborators left their mark on this work, and in the songs one hears reflections of U2 (“Waiting”), Bob Dylan (“Rocky World,” “The Unbreakable Chain”), and The Neville Brothers (“Indian Red”). At the foundation is American roots music: folk, country, and blues. The pleasure of Wynona is the way it combines otherworldly ambiance with the pared-down song structures of R&B, generating standouts like “The Messenger,” “Death of a Train,” and “Sleeping in the Devil’s Bed.”

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

A. Warner ,

This is a great record and you should buy it

This was our first introduction to Daniel Lanois other than as producer or, as we realized later, guest musician on other records. Every song on this album is a keeper, with the standouts being "Still Learning How to Crawl", "Sleeping in the Devil's Bed", and especially "The Collection of Marie Claire". Arrangements are wonderful, playing impeccable, Lanois' voice reminds of an old friend at the table, drinks at hand. I can't praise this record highly enough. Oh, and you've got to listen to it - ideally the first time - driving at night through some desolate area, the desert being ideal.

FloppyPillow ,

Solid.

After Acadie I was convinced no DL record was capable of holding a candle. I am happily wrong as this one
is a trophy. I know because I didn't like it on first listen... I put it away, came back to it put it down again and came back to it.... its one of THOSE records where it needs time to simmer and gets better and better. what a joy! Produced? duh! Overproduced? Nope. Masterfully simple with that signature second line providing ballast -as always.

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