7 Songs, 27 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Black Angels continue their exploration into all types of garage rock and psychedelia. The vintage organ sends their sound back several decades, and the guitars seem to be cranking out licks designed in 1966. Alex Maas’ vocals suggest a singer forging ahead with originality. Naturally, the rhythm section exists only to prove they’re lost in space—as no one could possibly dance to this music. Nor should they, for “The Executioner” moves at different speeds without warning and even emulates the effect of someone slowing down a turntable with hands. “Linda’s Gone” is the seven-song EP’s only extended workout, at six and a half minutes; a relatively muted time it is, coming across as a mix of The Velvet Underground and 13th Floor Elevators as played by suburban kids too polite to disturb the neighbors. “An Occurrence at 4507 South Third Street” feels longer than its three-plus minutes suggest. “Sunday Evening” and “Tired Eyes” are best, demonstrating the band’s pop side while still keeping things raw and rocking.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Black Angels continue their exploration into all types of garage rock and psychedelia. The vintage organ sends their sound back several decades, and the guitars seem to be cranking out licks designed in 1966. Alex Maas’ vocals suggest a singer forging ahead with originality. Naturally, the rhythm section exists only to prove they’re lost in space—as no one could possibly dance to this music. Nor should they, for “The Executioner” moves at different speeds without warning and even emulates the effect of someone slowing down a turntable with hands. “Linda’s Gone” is the seven-song EP’s only extended workout, at six and a half minutes; a relatively muted time it is, coming across as a mix of The Velvet Underground and 13th Floor Elevators as played by suburban kids too polite to disturb the neighbors. “An Occurrence at 4507 South Third Street” feels longer than its three-plus minutes suggest. “Sunday Evening” and “Tired Eyes” are best, demonstrating the band’s pop side while still keeping things raw and rocking.

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