BLAKLIST

Apple Music Hip-Hop

BLAKLIST

“I love the power that hip-hop gives me to tell my truth,” Filipino Aboriginal rapper and producer DOBBY tells Apple Music. “Our hip-hop is not just music. We make this music to educate and bring about change in this country.” Born from the streets and used to share stories by, for, and about communities whose voices and lives were more often than not underrepresented and ignored, particularly in mainstream music, the music has continued to evolve and expand into the biggest genre in the world. Still, at its roots lies that power to tell truths and amplify voices in a way unlike any other. Across Australia, First Nations hip-hop artists are carrying the torch, using rhymes to fight, reflect, educate, and celebrate life and identity. BLAKLIST pays tribute to the First Nations hip-hop artists whose music starts conversations, inspires action, and evolves and elevates Australian music. You’ll find songs that protest, mourn, celebrate, and honor—along with plenty that are simply having a great time. From A.B. Original, DOBBY, Miiesha, and Barkaa to Baker Boy, Tasman Keith, JK-47, and The Kid LAROI—Australia’s biggest hip-hop export ever—these are the sounds of the streets, the communities, and the people who hold 65,000 years of First Nations history in their heads and hearts. For DOBBY, who holds Murrawarri and Ngemba ancestry, it’s a genre that’s lived with him for his whole life. “Hip-hop was always there for me as a young boy,” he says. “I found comfort in early influences like Lauryn Hill, Outkast, The Pharcyde, and Lupe Fiasco, all of whom helped me to find what ‘real’ is to me and my identity.” He describes his track “Walk Away” as “a staunch song of cultural resistance and resilience.” Featuring duo The Merindas, it’s “a bold reminder that our First Peoples are still here, still fighting for land rights and treaty, still fighting for justice, still looking to be heard.” Whether you’re a part of the First Nations community or not, these songs showcase the talent—and realness—of artists from all across the country, and we hope you discover and explore the versatility and virtuosity exemplified throughout. “I hope listeners learn from our truths,” says DOBBY. “And I hope they can act on it mindfully.” This playlist has been curated by Wiradjuri woman Jaja Dare and the artwork has been created in collaboration with Gumbaynggirr artist Aretha Brown. Apple acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, culture, and community. We pay our respects to Elders past, present, and emerging.