Vicente Fernández
Vicente Fernández

Vicente Fernández

About Vicente Fernández

Singer Vicente Fernández’s larger-than-life presence––propelled through a decades-long career spanning radio, TV, film, and concert halls––feels out of synch among contemporary musicians, being more akin to the stuff of myth than celebrity. Born in Jalisco, Mexico in 1940, during ranchera’s Golden Age, Fernández stepped into the spotlight in the ‘60s, becoming one of the few artists in the genre that would ensure its lasting relevance in the aftermath of the rock 'n' roll asteroid. Though he’s sometimes been referred to as ranchera’s Frank Sinatra, a more apt comparison would situate him somewhere between Hank Williams and Johnny Cash, sharing Williams’ penchant for the lovesick blues and Cash’s rustic croon, both delivered with the everyman candor characteristic of traditional Mexican music. Following in the footsteps of his icons Pedro Infante and José Alfredo Jiménez, Fernández came to embody a kind of platonic ideal of the charro, Mexico’s own version of the cowboy. Yet more so than those figures, Chente (as he came to be known and loved) shattered the rugged veneer of the Mexican macho man, exposing the vulnerability behind the bravado in classics like “De Que Manera Te Olvido,” “Por Tu Maldito Amor,” and “Acá Entre Nos.” After five decades, Chente officially announced his retirement from the stage in 2016 with one final concert, Un Azteca en el Azteca––performed in Mexico’s iconic Azteca Stadium– a definitive testament to his lasting status as “the Idol of Mexico.”

  • HOMETOWN
    Huentitan del Alto, Mexico
  • BORN
    February 17, 1940

Similar Artists