Muddy Waters
Muddy Waters

Muddy Waters

About Muddy Waters

The father of the modern Chicago blues, Muddy Waters (born McKinley Morganfield) electrified the traditional sounds of the Delta as he cleared a path for rock ’n’ roll.

∙ At age 17, he sold a horse to buy his first guitar and rapidly earned a reputation as the best player in his region of the Mississippi Delta.
∙ Ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax recorded Waters for the first time in 1941 and 1942—sessions later released as The Complete Plantation Recordings, which went on to win a Grammy Award.
∙ “Louisiana Blues,” released in 1950, was the first of his 13 Top 10 Blues singles, which include such classics as “(I’m Your) Hoochie Coochie Man” and “Mannish Boy.”
∙ His Newport Jazz Festival concert, released as At Newport 1960, exposed Chicago blues to a new audience and is ranked among Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.
∙ In 1964, The Rolling Stones, who had taken their name from a Waters track, went on a pilgrimage to Chess Records, his label, to meet their hero and record a few sides at Chess’ studio.
∙ Between 1972 and 1980, he won a record-setting six Grammy Awards for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording.
∙ In the ’80s, Waters was inducted into both the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame and (posthumously) the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.
Rolling Stone ranked him No. 17 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

  • HOMETOWN
    Rolling Fork, MS
  • BORN
    April 4, 1915

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