Marillion
Marillion

Marillion

About Marillion

In the early ’80s, Marillion went against the grain with a sound heavily inspired by ’70s prog rock. In an unlikely development, they became avatars of a vital new movement, which they would eventually transcend. Originally fronted by a charismatic Scotsman named Derek Dick, a.k.a. Fish, the Buckinghamshire band debuted in 1983 with Script for a Jester’s Tear, adding a contemporary edge to their vintage Genesis and Pink Floyd nods. They connected in a big way in the UK and, along with bands like IQ and Pendragon, led a neo-prog revolution in British rock. Their popularity peaked with the 1985 concept album Misplaced Childhood, which broke through in America via the poppy “Kayleigh.” But after one more album, Fish split for a solo career, and starting with 1989’s Seasons End, his replacement was Steve Hogarth. Marillion moved away from their prog influences while remaining literally progressive, exploring electronics and other textures, and constantly experimenting with song structure. Through the decades they released a long string of highly acclaimed albums that reinforced their cult-hero status.

  • ORIGIN
    Aylesbury, England
  • FORMED
    1979

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