10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Pity the poor singer-songwriter who would’ve had a sizable audience in the early ‘70s and who now must settle for whatever word-of-mouth he can muster. Duluth MN’s David Dondero’s been kicking around since the early ‘90s, releasing albums of great lyrical intrigue and decent enough melodies to keep him rolling along. On his seventh studio album, 2010’s # Zero With a Bullet, the black humor is everywhere. “Jesus from 12 to 6” picks up a convincing rock band along the way to tell its tale of a homeless man’s religious convictions. “Just A Baby In Your Momma’s Eyes” takes a folksy sentiment and turns up the garage band backing until it sounds like Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers splattering all over the stage. The title track comes closest to his hero Townes Van Zandt with its loose, loping casualness towards the awful fates that await. “It’s Peaceful Here” sounds like country music gently broken by miles of rough road. “Carolina Moon” and “Job Boss” get by with a banjo that’s more distraught than Dondero’s idealistic heart.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Pity the poor singer-songwriter who would’ve had a sizable audience in the early ‘70s and who now must settle for whatever word-of-mouth he can muster. Duluth MN’s David Dondero’s been kicking around since the early ‘90s, releasing albums of great lyrical intrigue and decent enough melodies to keep him rolling along. On his seventh studio album, 2010’s # Zero With a Bullet, the black humor is everywhere. “Jesus from 12 to 6” picks up a convincing rock band along the way to tell its tale of a homeless man’s religious convictions. “Just A Baby In Your Momma’s Eyes” takes a folksy sentiment and turns up the garage band backing until it sounds like Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers splattering all over the stage. The title track comes closest to his hero Townes Van Zandt with its loose, loping casualness towards the awful fates that await. “It’s Peaceful Here” sounds like country music gently broken by miles of rough road. “Carolina Moon” and “Job Boss” get by with a banjo that’s more distraught than Dondero’s idealistic heart.

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