11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you missed Led Zeppelin the first time around and wondered what all the fuss was about, well, you’re in luck: A band of (mostly) brothers from Frankenmuth, Michigan, is here to carry the torch for blues-based howling, loud guitars, and tight pants as mass entertainment. “Rock ’n’ roll is a lost ideology,” bassist Sam Kiszka tells Apple Music in the group's Up Next interview. “It turned into a niche thing. You’ve got to hit the roots again.” That’s exactly what the band does on their debut album, which feels of another time.

Swirling together the techniques and textures of rock and blues greats—The Allman Brothers Band, Cream, B.B. King, Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, and most recognizably Zep, among others—Anthem of the Peaceful Army delivers monstrous riffs (“When the Curtain Falls”), jangly strummers (“The New Day”), and earnest acoustic ballads (“Anthem”). The end result is a nostalgia rush for those who know the references and a thrilling point of entry for those who may not. It helps that frontman Josh Kiszka, born with an engine of a tenor, has perfectly mastered Robert Plant’s shrill yelps and yowls ("Watching Over”) and rock ’n’ roll attitude—which covers everything from wardrobe and stage presence to the album as a stand-alone experience in the streaming era. “We’d like people to listen to this all the way through,” Kiszka says. “And f**king loud.”

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you missed Led Zeppelin the first time around and wondered what all the fuss was about, well, you’re in luck: A band of (mostly) brothers from Frankenmuth, Michigan, is here to carry the torch for blues-based howling, loud guitars, and tight pants as mass entertainment. “Rock ’n’ roll is a lost ideology,” bassist Sam Kiszka tells Apple Music in the group's Up Next interview. “It turned into a niche thing. You’ve got to hit the roots again.” That’s exactly what the band does on their debut album, which feels of another time.

Swirling together the techniques and textures of rock and blues greats—The Allman Brothers Band, Cream, B.B. King, Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, and most recognizably Zep, among others—Anthem of the Peaceful Army delivers monstrous riffs (“When the Curtain Falls”), jangly strummers (“The New Day”), and earnest acoustic ballads (“Anthem”). The end result is a nostalgia rush for those who know the references and a thrilling point of entry for those who may not. It helps that frontman Josh Kiszka, born with an engine of a tenor, has perfectly mastered Robert Plant’s shrill yelps and yowls ("Watching Over”) and rock ’n’ roll attitude—which covers everything from wardrobe and stage presence to the album as a stand-alone experience in the streaming era. “We’d like people to listen to this all the way through,” Kiszka says. “And f**king loud.”

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
881 Ratings

881 Ratings

H/\LF-LIFE 3 ,

Why the hate?

People on here are giving 1-Star reviews because they sound like Led Zeppelin, yet every single one of those crappy mumble SoundCloud rappers sounds exactly the same and they’re considered “innovative” by people. A band has finally come along that’s reminiscent of the time when rock, and just music in general, was good. We need more of this

Haloguy1000 ,

All the hate won’t stop them from succeeding

I am a die hard Led Zeppelin fan and honestly, all of this comparing is getting old. People look past the talent and the hard work and scream “WANNABE”. These guys will never be Led Zeppelin, mostly because John Bonham made Led Zeppelin who they were. These guys are Greta Van Fleet, a band that writes their own songs and a band that enjoys playing music. And do yourself a favor and look up the definition of Cover Band. In case you’re too lazy, a cover band is a band with a set list (songs for uneducated people) that consist of the band they are trying to emulate. I have seen a single cover of Led Zeppelin by them on any of their albums. Either way, these guys will grow. And as a die hard Zep fan, I’ll be on the GVF train the whole ride through.

eDro foSho ,

Rock is alive and well

This is the best band since the grunge era. Anyone who gives this a negative review probably doesn’t want to believe a young band could make music as good as their golden days.