13 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

More than a year after her breakout hit “1950,” King Princess delivers Cheap Queen, her soulful and reflective debut album. Balancing husky, vintage-sounding vocals with subtle flourishes (a vibraphone here, a chiming synth there), the project loosely traces a young relationship’s hopeful beginning and wounded end. Throughout, we get to see the emerging queer-pop icon, a 20-year-old Brooklyn native named Mikaela Straus, evolve: Meandering mind games (“Useless Phrases”) and self-deprecations (“Cheap Queen”) become earnest observations ("Watching My Phone") and confident tell-offs (“You Destroyed My Heart”). The final number—a breathtaking, pensive ballad that unfolds delicately—feels fragile and guarded: “And it might take a sec/My world’s become a mess/I’m second-guessing all the things I used to want to be,” she sings, a bit more measured than she was at the start. But she’s stronger, too, armed with the self-assurance of someone who has had their heart ripped apart and, to their own surprise, survived.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

More than a year after her breakout hit “1950,” King Princess delivers Cheap Queen, her soulful and reflective debut album. Balancing husky, vintage-sounding vocals with subtle flourishes (a vibraphone here, a chiming synth there), the project loosely traces a young relationship’s hopeful beginning and wounded end. Throughout, we get to see the emerging queer-pop icon, a 20-year-old Brooklyn native named Mikaela Straus, evolve: Meandering mind games (“Useless Phrases”) and self-deprecations (“Cheap Queen”) become earnest observations ("Watching My Phone") and confident tell-offs (“You Destroyed My Heart”). The final number—a breathtaking, pensive ballad that unfolds delicately—feels fragile and guarded: “And it might take a sec/My world’s become a mess/I’m second-guessing all the things I used to want to be,” she sings, a bit more measured than she was at the start. But she’s stronger, too, armed with the self-assurance of someone who has had their heart ripped apart and, to their own surprise, survived.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.7 out of 5
108 Ratings

108 Ratings

expo eighty-six ,

👑

It’s got some jams. King Princess could be a force in 2020.

'*^~-Colibrí-~^*' ,

Some people are

homophobic. This album isn't out yet. How are you leaving reviews for something you haven't listened to? I'm just leaving this to balance it out, which is sad but necessary. As for the explicit content of kp's other songs/eps that people are 'disgusted' by: deal with it. People are gay. Gay people have sex. You don't have to like it, just leave us alone. Straight musicians make explicitly sexual songs all the time so maybe stop being hypocrites??? And of the songs that are out, not even all of them are sexual.

(Also I think 1 person left a review complaining that it's too different from kp's other songs and/or they didn't like the album cover. That's fair. I don't think that's a good reason since, again, there are many more songs left on the album that haven't even been released for us to hear yet, but I understand why that would affect your view if you preferred the old sound. The album cover complaint is a pretty weird thing to rate music off of though..)

Jsonjo ,

The music industry is OVERSATURATED

With basic talent. A dime a dozen, sex-crazed young artist with generic, trendy lyrics and sound. Im 26 and shouldnt be saying this. If you like it, you like it. But this is the type of empty-headed, BASIC tomfoolery that is the main reason why everyone else is telling us to get WOKE. The music industry just churns out anything young, sexy, gay, or someone with hints of mental illness. And we’re supposed to flood their youtube channels with “we stan” or some bullsh7t like that. Got me over here listening to music from DECADES ago. Im over this generation....

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