17 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over 30 years ago, John Michael Talbot began his career as a Catholic folk troubadour with a musical interpretation of the Mass — now, with Worship and Bow Down, he returns to this theme with a deepened sense of artistry and spiritual vision. As both a veteran singer/songwriter and the founder of a monastic community, he brings a unique sensibility to his classically influenced compositions. Talbot is at the height of his powers, matching lyrics based upon sacred texts to melodies suggestive of church music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Worship and Bow Down embroiders its songs with evocative string and woodwind orchestrations, framing Talbot’s haunting tenor at the center of the album. While this song-cycle is best appreciated as a unified work, certain tracks stand out for their sheer beauty and intensity of feeling. “Hind’s Feet on High Places,” “Nothing Is Impossible” and “Hail Mary” have the resonance of ancient hymns, yet feel immediate. A series of a cappella chants – particularly “Lamb of God” – achieve a crystalline purity of emotion.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Over 30 years ago, John Michael Talbot began his career as a Catholic folk troubadour with a musical interpretation of the Mass — now, with Worship and Bow Down, he returns to this theme with a deepened sense of artistry and spiritual vision. As both a veteran singer/songwriter and the founder of a monastic community, he brings a unique sensibility to his classically influenced compositions. Talbot is at the height of his powers, matching lyrics based upon sacred texts to melodies suggestive of church music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Worship and Bow Down embroiders its songs with evocative string and woodwind orchestrations, framing Talbot’s haunting tenor at the center of the album. While this song-cycle is best appreciated as a unified work, certain tracks stand out for their sheer beauty and intensity of feeling. “Hind’s Feet on High Places,” “Nothing Is Impossible” and “Hail Mary” have the resonance of ancient hymns, yet feel immediate. A series of a cappella chants – particularly “Lamb of God” – achieve a crystalline purity of emotion.

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