13 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bruce Springsteen has it both ways here. He manages to speak for the tenor of the nation with the album's title track and attempts a western epic with the eight-minute "Outlaw Pete," but elsewhere dials down the drama with short, compact pop songs that enjoy their modest surroundings. Producer Brendan O'Brien keeps the band on a tight leash, marshaling a wall of sound that's dense with ringing guitars and stealth keyboards. Springsteen yearns for his younger days with the pangs of simple infatuation on "Queen Of the Supermarket" and offers basic platitudes for "What Love Can Do." In his desire to turn an album around quicker than he has in some time, he's left his lyrics a bit ragged, but makes up for it with an immediacy of tone. His confident vocals identify every track from the jaunty roadhouse jam of "Good Eye" to the somber crawl of "The Wrestler," featured in the Mickey Rourke film of the same name. "My Lucky Day," "Kingdom Of Days" and "Surprise, Surprise" sing out with a sincerity that recalls the AM guitar pop of the mid-'60s with Bruce looking back and figuring that some old- fashioned musical values might vault him ahead into the future.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bruce Springsteen has it both ways here. He manages to speak for the tenor of the nation with the album's title track and attempts a western epic with the eight-minute "Outlaw Pete," but elsewhere dials down the drama with short, compact pop songs that enjoy their modest surroundings. Producer Brendan O'Brien keeps the band on a tight leash, marshaling a wall of sound that's dense with ringing guitars and stealth keyboards. Springsteen yearns for his younger days with the pangs of simple infatuation on "Queen Of the Supermarket" and offers basic platitudes for "What Love Can Do." In his desire to turn an album around quicker than he has in some time, he's left his lyrics a bit ragged, but makes up for it with an immediacy of tone. His confident vocals identify every track from the jaunty roadhouse jam of "Good Eye" to the somber crawl of "The Wrestler," featured in the Mickey Rourke film of the same name. "My Lucky Day," "Kingdom Of Days" and "Surprise, Surprise" sing out with a sincerity that recalls the AM guitar pop of the mid-'60s with Bruce looking back and figuring that some old- fashioned musical values might vault him ahead into the future.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.5 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

The bossmann77 ,

Older era Springsteen-Solid

Your "Born to Run" and facing down "Darkness on the Edge of Town" in your 20's early 30's....family and "The Ties that Bind" come along into your 30's.....basically I would say this is solid Springsteen....given that there is no way to turn back the hands of time.....still stout & sound Boss....thx

Travelingmood ,

Least favorite Springsteen album

It's music by The Boss so I really, truly want to like it but I can't. Besides the title track, there really isn't anything here I see myself as wanting to listen to again when he's created so much better work. For an album that supposedly is all about hope and positivity as the album review says, it's a snoozefest.

rebelaxe ,

its ok

old springsteen albums had no weak tunes this one does, I do not like the pop direction, hope he strays from that soon. My lucky day, working on a dream and the wrestler are worth the price.

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