8 Songs, 22 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

That Willow Smith would be a force of genre-twisting, experimental pop should surprise no one. The young star has been defying expectations since she was a kid (her debut single "Whip My Hair" was released when she was nine years old), operating with an artistic eye and an individualistic spirit. Here, the 18-year-old singer, already on her third studio album, stretches surprising sounds and textures—chilling spiritual chanting (“Then [Interlude]”) and breathy R&B-blues (“Time Machine")—into mysterious and unusual forms. The moods are extreme: “PrettyGirlz” begins as an intimate, controlled croon before bursting into a wall of dense electric guitar, and “Samo Is Now” layers dizzying, crisscrossing vocals over shy drums. Smith isn’t a powerhouse singer, but she uses her voice well, weaving her fluttery falsetto into tracks that are already vibrating with activity. And she may well be on her way to powerhouse status: On songs like “Overthinking IT,” a devastatingly soulful number that rings of Kadhja Bonet, she reveals an expansive range and vocal dexterity that suggest she’s just warming up.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

That Willow Smith would be a force of genre-twisting, experimental pop should surprise no one. The young star has been defying expectations since she was a kid (her debut single "Whip My Hair" was released when she was nine years old), operating with an artistic eye and an individualistic spirit. Here, the 18-year-old singer, already on her third studio album, stretches surprising sounds and textures—chilling spiritual chanting (“Then [Interlude]”) and breathy R&B-blues (“Time Machine")—into mysterious and unusual forms. The moods are extreme: “PrettyGirlz” begins as an intimate, controlled croon before bursting into a wall of dense electric guitar, and “Samo Is Now” layers dizzying, crisscrossing vocals over shy drums. Smith isn’t a powerhouse singer, but she uses her voice well, weaving her fluttery falsetto into tracks that are already vibrating with activity. And she may well be on her way to powerhouse status: On songs like “Overthinking IT,” a devastatingly soulful number that rings of Kadhja Bonet, she reveals an expansive range and vocal dexterity that suggest she’s just warming up.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.7 out of 5
136 Ratings

136 Ratings

#kingshaunjadin ,

hmmm

not that the project is bad.. or that she isn’t a talented artist. her vocals are DEFINITELY there. i for one just think this album and jaden’s as well just lack.. life. i wouldn’t say there are any show stopping songs on either of their new projects. these songs all sound like interludes. i can tell they’re both going for authenticity, which i’m ALL for. songs like “wait a minute!” by willow, and “ICON” by jaden smith are the ones that pretty much defined and began their new era of music, and those two songs demonstrate their talent and lack neither authenticity nor life. when making music, i personally feel as if you need a little bit of both. here, i heard the authenticity in her work, but not necessarily the lively part that people seem to respond the best to, and that’s my personal opinion. keep it up tho! for what it’s worth the album is NOT bad at all and it’s almost a vibe that i guess i’ll have to listen again to get into.

LAWdesign ,

Cocteau Twins Redux

I like where she's going, but this is so heavily influenced by the Cocteau Twins, that I'm not really hearing who *she* is as an artist yet. Best track: Overthinking IT.

Maxpissed ,

Jeez!

I can’t believe I wasted those few seconds of my life listening to that garbage. Maybe she should try movies?

More By WILLOW