30 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A formidable pop force in their Canadian homeland, Nova Scotia’s Sloan have been relegated to cult status elsewhere. Their ‘60s flavored retro-pop and early ‘70s AM radio hooks make their every release feel like a trip into an alternate musical library where the likes of the Beatles, Badfinger, Eric Carmen and the Raspberries have been recast as modern rockers. Never Hear the End of It is a sprawling 30(!) track album that amazingly never wears out its welcome – though the sheer abundance is inevitably overwhelming. The tracks come charging out of the gate with tight harmonies, enthusiastic handclaps, hastily strummed guitars and a myriad of keyboards. If you weren’t told otherwise, you might think this was a collection of singles spanning their entire career. While there are minor tracks that serve as segues to other tracks (“Something’s Wrong”), overall these are well thought out compositions that playfully twist their influences into new configurations (hear the “Tomorrow Never Knows” drumbeat behind “Golden Eyes”). Traces of garage rock (“Ana Lucia”), the Beach Boys and Hollies (“I Understand”) the ‘60s Brit Invasion (“Will I Belong”) and ’70s new wave-punk rock (“HFXNSHC”) abound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A formidable pop force in their Canadian homeland, Nova Scotia’s Sloan have been relegated to cult status elsewhere. Their ‘60s flavored retro-pop and early ‘70s AM radio hooks make their every release feel like a trip into an alternate musical library where the likes of the Beatles, Badfinger, Eric Carmen and the Raspberries have been recast as modern rockers. Never Hear the End of It is a sprawling 30(!) track album that amazingly never wears out its welcome – though the sheer abundance is inevitably overwhelming. The tracks come charging out of the gate with tight harmonies, enthusiastic handclaps, hastily strummed guitars and a myriad of keyboards. If you weren’t told otherwise, you might think this was a collection of singles spanning their entire career. While there are minor tracks that serve as segues to other tracks (“Something’s Wrong”), overall these are well thought out compositions that playfully twist their influences into new configurations (hear the “Tomorrow Never Knows” drumbeat behind “Golden Eyes”). Traces of garage rock (“Ana Lucia”), the Beach Boys and Hollies (“I Understand”) the ‘60s Brit Invasion (“Will I Belong”) and ’70s new wave-punk rock (“HFXNSHC”) abound.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

NickZ ,

A Must-Hear

Sloan's "Never Hear The End of It" is an ironic title, because of the sheer amount of tracks. However, if you listen to the album all the way through without skipping a track, it's one of the most refreshing musical experiences in recent memory. Taken all in at once, "Never Hear the End of It" stands up as a remarkable accomplishment, although some songs are far too short, especially the stellar "Flying High Again". Mostly, however, the songs on "NHTEOI" are extremely catchy, as is the case with most Sloan albums, and the songwriting is still top notch. Great to see this album released in the States.

Highlights for me are...well, the whole thing. However, if you only have to pick one track, it's the amazing "Fading Into Obscurity".

will woolf ,

Sloan's White Album

Sloan makes a triumphant return to form with NHTEOI. Throwing everything but the kitchen sink at this record, the emphasis here is on songwriting and not on (over) production, and it makes for their best collection of songs since Between the Bridges and maybe even One Chord to Another. Is every track great? No, but the record as a whole has an energy and feeling that can not be denied. Essential for any Sloan fan!

Unreachable ,

....On Planet Earth.....

Sloan is EASILY the most underrated rock band on planet earth at this moment.
This record stands out among a catalog that has yet to have any real weaknesses. They have achieved, in quality of songwriting and a catalog of music, what very few bands in the HISTORY of rock and roll have accomplished. I can't believe they have more to say. They should be creatively spent by the time of this record and yet it feels like they've just begun to hit their stride.

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