6 Songs, 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

White Reaper’s debut EP is everything you want a debut EP from a punk band to be like. It’s raw. It’s melodic. It’s energized. And it features none of the subtlety that happens when a band's been together too long. This Louisville, Ky.–based power trio—consisting of singer/guitarist Tony Esposito and twin brothers Nick (drums) and Sam (bass) Wilkerson—threw together this six-song, 16-minute free-for-all with all the excitement of a young band thrilled to have their say. “Cool” kicks things off with a touch of garage punk, while “Half Bad” appears to add a rather distorted keyboard to the sound for an extra touch of bubblegum. “She Wants To” needs to be played several times over, since they’ve deliberately made it too short to leave you wanting more. “Conspirator” adds another level of distortion and chaos to the recording, proving noise can be an instrument if used correctly. “Ohh (Yeah)” cleans up the sound a tad and brings a keyboard up in the mix for the one track that reaches more than four minutes and sounds like a punk’s idea of commercial radio in 1977.

EDITORS’ NOTES

White Reaper’s debut EP is everything you want a debut EP from a punk band to be like. It’s raw. It’s melodic. It’s energized. And it features none of the subtlety that happens when a band's been together too long. This Louisville, Ky.–based power trio—consisting of singer/guitarist Tony Esposito and twin brothers Nick (drums) and Sam (bass) Wilkerson—threw together this six-song, 16-minute free-for-all with all the excitement of a young band thrilled to have their say. “Cool” kicks things off with a touch of garage punk, while “Half Bad” appears to add a rather distorted keyboard to the sound for an extra touch of bubblegum. “She Wants To” needs to be played several times over, since they’ve deliberately made it too short to leave you wanting more. “Conspirator” adds another level of distortion and chaos to the recording, proving noise can be an instrument if used correctly. “Ohh (Yeah)” cleans up the sound a tad and brings a keyboard up in the mix for the one track that reaches more than four minutes and sounds like a punk’s idea of commercial radio in 1977.

TITLE TIME

More By White Reaper

You May Also Like