13 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Nashville sextet is made up of rock ’n’ roll–steeped boys out for a good time. The band's debut, 2011’s Loose Jewels (Yeah…), was a fine, supercharged collection of shouty, anthemic punk with a discernable dose of wacky “we don’t take ourselves too seriously” modesty. On the band's sophomore album, I’m Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams, it stuns with a sharper sound and a refined clarity of vision. With four guitars—four—it’s easy to get carried away, but Diarrhea Planet finds sure footing on I’m Rich… , and it’s a surprisingly good time. In between the hyper-bouncy pop-flavored licks on raging numbers like “The Sound of My Ceiling Fan” and the Superchunk-style “Separations,” tunes like “Togano” call for choreographed headbanging and hair-whipping, while the melancholy permeating “Kids” and the confessional “Skeleton” could become soul-clutching memory-makers down the road. “Right now is the best time/Dumb and young/And so full of fire,” Jordan Smith hollers on the just-hooky-enough “Separations.” An anthem for everyone dumb and young, for sure.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Nashville sextet is made up of rock ’n’ roll–steeped boys out for a good time. The band's debut, 2011’s Loose Jewels (Yeah…), was a fine, supercharged collection of shouty, anthemic punk with a discernable dose of wacky “we don’t take ourselves too seriously” modesty. On the band's sophomore album, I’m Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams, it stuns with a sharper sound and a refined clarity of vision. With four guitars—four—it’s easy to get carried away, but Diarrhea Planet finds sure footing on I’m Rich… , and it’s a surprisingly good time. In between the hyper-bouncy pop-flavored licks on raging numbers like “The Sound of My Ceiling Fan” and the Superchunk-style “Separations,” tunes like “Togano” call for choreographed headbanging and hair-whipping, while the melancholy permeating “Kids” and the confessional “Skeleton” could become soul-clutching memory-makers down the road. “Right now is the best time/Dumb and young/And so full of fire,” Jordan Smith hollers on the just-hooky-enough “Separations.” An anthem for everyone dumb and young, for sure.

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