12 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Amen Dunes is the work of Brooklyn-based musician Damon McMahon. Though his previous albums have been largely solo performances, Love is produced by Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s Dave Bryant and Efrim Menuck and features the additional support of some longtime friends—drummer Parker Kindred and Jordi Wheeler on guitar and piano—along with Colin Stetson on sax and occasional vocals from Iceage’s Elias Bender Ronnenfelt (on “Lonely Richard” and “Green Eyes”). The nearest comparison might be Bonnie "Prince" Billy, who often works a similarly obscure method to get the desired recording effect. “Everybody Is Crazy,” in particular, sounds like a gorgeous lost BPB track. “I Can’t Dig It” uses a deliberately lo-fi approach and sounds like a bootleg recording of a band playing in a cavernous hall. The remaining songs settle into a modest, mystical tone, with the piano-based “Sixteen” sounding as wired as Daniel Johnston and the acoustic “I Know Myself” offering a calmer view.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Amen Dunes is the work of Brooklyn-based musician Damon McMahon. Though his previous albums have been largely solo performances, Love is produced by Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s Dave Bryant and Efrim Menuck and features the additional support of some longtime friends—drummer Parker Kindred and Jordi Wheeler on guitar and piano—along with Colin Stetson on sax and occasional vocals from Iceage’s Elias Bender Ronnenfelt (on “Lonely Richard” and “Green Eyes”). The nearest comparison might be Bonnie "Prince" Billy, who often works a similarly obscure method to get the desired recording effect. “Everybody Is Crazy,” in particular, sounds like a gorgeous lost BPB track. “I Can’t Dig It” uses a deliberately lo-fi approach and sounds like a bootleg recording of a band playing in a cavernous hall. The remaining songs settle into a modest, mystical tone, with the piano-based “Sixteen” sounding as wired as Daniel Johnston and the acoustic “I Know Myself” offering a calmer view.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

walkerpogue ,

Melody, Melody, Melody

A really strong release reminiscent of Cass Mccombs if he were blissed out and beautiful. The whole album sounds spontaneous as if the whole affair might have been captured in one evening in a cavernous space. Echoes blend together with melody after melody to make this a wonderful find well worth the purchase.

A warning: reviewers keep comparing it to Will Oldham and I couldn't find too much connecting tissue justifying the comparison. At moments it sounds like 'Tennessee Fire' era MMJ or 'Pride' era Phosphorescent. Loose and beautiful.

cest meyy ,

floating out to sea

really digging this album. especially amen dunes. pop open a bottle of wine, take it to the ocean and drink under a full moon with your special someone. or better yet stay up at your ceiling and think about life lol

chrsnorbt ,

I can dig it…

I could run down a massive list of who I think this sounds like, but I think that would be missing the point. This is timeless music here. It more or less sounds like outsider music from the late 70’s or so. But instead of it having that super unpolished thing all the way through you only get a glimpse of full on fringe on a few songs. What you get instead is songwriting mastery that has a huge seventies flare to it. Super mellow, buy it, turn it on and get lost. The further you get the more the album devolves or evolves, it really depends on whether you’re inside looking out or outside looking in.

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