12 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seattle-based artist Brian Fennell takes his recording alias from the Welsh word “syml,” which translates to “simple.” And certainly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more direct, forthright rumination on desire, loneliness, and loss than his self-titled debut album as SYML. But if Fennell is the sort of songwriter who favors blunt, visceral language to convey his inner turmoil (“My head is a room and the room’s full of broken glass,” he offers by way of introduction), as a producer, he’s a far more enigmatic and elusive character. As he established in his previous band, Barcelona—and reaffirms with SYML’s calling-card single “Where’s My Love”—Fennell orbits the intersection of R&B minimalism, indie-pop intimacy, and electronic experimentation occupied by the likes of James Blake and Justin Vernon. But the thrill of this record is that you never know which direction he’s going to veer. Though the heart-racing synth-pop of “Clean Eyes” and the frisky electro-funk of “Break Free” betray his crowd-pleasing ambitions early on, Fennell gradually steers the record toward atmospheric oddities like “WDWGILY,” which spins a repeated ominous phrase (“Where did we go?/I love you”) into a disorienting future-soul swirl that conjures the mental fog of a post-breakup hangover.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seattle-based artist Brian Fennell takes his recording alias from the Welsh word “syml,” which translates to “simple.” And certainly, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more direct, forthright rumination on desire, loneliness, and loss than his self-titled debut album as SYML. But if Fennell is the sort of songwriter who favors blunt, visceral language to convey his inner turmoil (“My head is a room and the room’s full of broken glass,” he offers by way of introduction), as a producer, he’s a far more enigmatic and elusive character. As he established in his previous band, Barcelona—and reaffirms with SYML’s calling-card single “Where’s My Love”—Fennell orbits the intersection of R&B minimalism, indie-pop intimacy, and electronic experimentation occupied by the likes of James Blake and Justin Vernon. But the thrill of this record is that you never know which direction he’s going to veer. Though the heart-racing synth-pop of “Clean Eyes” and the frisky electro-funk of “Break Free” betray his crowd-pleasing ambitions early on, Fennell gradually steers the record toward atmospheric oddities like “WDWGILY,” which spins a repeated ominous phrase (“Where did we go?/I love you”) into a disorienting future-soul swirl that conjures the mental fog of a post-breakup hangover.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

Rhein7 ,

Music for the Soul - beautiful!!!

Have been a fan since I heard "where's my love" on Suits. This album doesn't disappoint and just gets better with every listen. Loving the new version of Wildfire, also loving Connor and WIWGILY. Shame Hurts for Me wasn't added to the album. Can't wait to hear you play in Brooklyn.

The bellacat ,

Saw the band in concert

Seen Depeche Mode, U2 three times, Phil Collins, Cranberries, Sarah McLaughlin, Tool, Snoop Dogg, Korn, NF, and a host of others and in my opinion SYML’s passion and awe inspiring live vocals rank at numero uno. Love this dude’s passion as he performs. It’s not faked or try hard. Songs here are legit but if you have the chance to have them in your town; you’ll thank me later.

JEL1181 ,

Amazing

This guy's music is amazing. Not sure why he doesn't get more attention. Go watch some of his videos as well. His music hits all the emotion points in your brain.

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