9 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If it’s variety you seek, from fuzzed-out rock guitars and high female harmonies, to the odd saxophone and accordion, all of it tethered to bursts of old fashioned Hendrix-like power-trio freak-outs, then Williamsburg, Brooklyn trio Lights is quirky treasure. Guitarist Sophia Knapp and drummer Linnea Vedder, ably anchored by bassist Andy Macleod (and special-effects wrangler Smoke Wizard), are a charming vocal duo, their harmonies so uncannily sisterly it’s natural to wonder if they’re family. “Fire Night,” is a disco tune, complete with deadpan French spoken word choruses, schizoguitar licks and a pair of sassy female voices. In “War Machine” their high-pitched wordless vocals float above more guitar squall and bass hammering, while on “Love” they break into silky, happy, irresistible pop — complete with a spooky coda. Most encouraging is the fact that Rites ends with the stunning, measured cover of Fleetwood Mac’s, “Nothing Left to Build,” where Macleod shows he too can sing and the band cements its old-school cred. A spree of nimble contrasts and keen anticipation.

EDITORS’ NOTES

If it’s variety you seek, from fuzzed-out rock guitars and high female harmonies, to the odd saxophone and accordion, all of it tethered to bursts of old fashioned Hendrix-like power-trio freak-outs, then Williamsburg, Brooklyn trio Lights is quirky treasure. Guitarist Sophia Knapp and drummer Linnea Vedder, ably anchored by bassist Andy Macleod (and special-effects wrangler Smoke Wizard), are a charming vocal duo, their harmonies so uncannily sisterly it’s natural to wonder if they’re family. “Fire Night,” is a disco tune, complete with deadpan French spoken word choruses, schizoguitar licks and a pair of sassy female voices. In “War Machine” their high-pitched wordless vocals float above more guitar squall and bass hammering, while on “Love” they break into silky, happy, irresistible pop — complete with a spooky coda. Most encouraging is the fact that Rites ends with the stunning, measured cover of Fleetwood Mac’s, “Nothing Left to Build,” where Macleod shows he too can sing and the band cements its old-school cred. A spree of nimble contrasts and keen anticipation.

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