12 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Liverpool’s Clinic are that coolest of garage bands. They play the music’s elemental rhythms and feed off its youthful spunk and careless energy, but without adhering to the music’s sonic provincialism, preferring to wallow in a thick wash of fancy reverb and powerfully distorted guitars that could just as easily come from ‘80s skatepunks or ‘90s shoegazer tribes than the original ‘60s artifacts. For their fourth album, Visitations, the group centers on short but pointed barbs in the best ‘60s and ‘80s Nuggets styled “tradition.” The helter-skelter sitar-like psychedelic guitars of “If You Could Read Your Mind,” the pounding tribal celebration of  “Children of Kellogg” whose atonality recalls the finest of Public Image Limited, the 80s-punk of the 1:46 of “Tusk” and the swooning metronomic buzz of the ghostly ballad “Paradise” (sung in a voice that sounds as if it’s struggling to keep awake) all coalesce into a rewarding spirited romp. But this isn’t just a simple mix and match of influences; it's a trippy trip through the backwoods of punk and psychedelia delivered without irony and with much affection.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Liverpool’s Clinic are that coolest of garage bands. They play the music’s elemental rhythms and feed off its youthful spunk and careless energy, but without adhering to the music’s sonic provincialism, preferring to wallow in a thick wash of fancy reverb and powerfully distorted guitars that could just as easily come from ‘80s skatepunks or ‘90s shoegazer tribes than the original ‘60s artifacts. For their fourth album, Visitations, the group centers on short but pointed barbs in the best ‘60s and ‘80s Nuggets styled “tradition.” The helter-skelter sitar-like psychedelic guitars of “If You Could Read Your Mind,” the pounding tribal celebration of  “Children of Kellogg” whose atonality recalls the finest of Public Image Limited, the 80s-punk of the 1:46 of “Tusk” and the swooning metronomic buzz of the ghostly ballad “Paradise” (sung in a voice that sounds as if it’s struggling to keep awake) all coalesce into a rewarding spirited romp. But this isn’t just a simple mix and match of influences; it's a trippy trip through the backwoods of punk and psychedelia delivered without irony and with much affection.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.1 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

ts_default ,

Clinic comes back

After the failure of Winchester Cathedral to arouse my interest, I was happily surprised to hear this gem of an album. I think this is probably their most accessible album to date, though I must say I am partial to their earlier ep's. If you're already a fan, get this album-or wait for the bonus version being released in the US in january

NoHaircut ,

Pretty Good

Continues where "Walking With Thee" left off with creepy, haunting minimal lo-fi soul! Worth a listen!

ATL P-Funk ,

Of course, it's Clinic!!!

I've been waiting a while for this one and not to my surprise it matched my expectations, not exceeded them, just matched them. There were a couple riffs I noticed that were very similar to other songs on other albums. I know they have their own sound, and I love that sound, but that's what tore me away from Winchester Cathedral...too much of the old. Although, these new songs had a kick to them as the ones on, let's say, WC didn't have. But once i listened to the 'The Cape', there it was, the sound I was looking for. Something completely different and new. It left me on a high note and wanting more. So thank you Clinic for giving me that extra track! All in all, excellent album. The drums and the rythyms, yet again, make the album. I would've given it 5 stars if they didn't use so many of those similar guitar riffs. Clinic's the bomb!!! You're safe buying this and won't be dissapointed.

More By Clinic

You May Also Like