11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

One of a handful of precocious young guitarists who studied under Reverend Gary Davis in the ‘60’s, David Bromberg is among the select few country-blues revivalists of that era to have an intuitive and unforced relationship with the genre. Like the similarly gifted Ry Cooder, Bromberg has spent much of his career as an in demand session musician, and on Use Me Bromberg solicits contributions from many of the crack songwriters that he has provided musical backing for over the years. Use Me sees Bromberg interpreting songs by Americana luminaries like Guy Clark, Dr. John, John Hiatt and Levon Helm. Bromberg’s readings of these songs are universally genial and relaxed, his guitar playing is masterful but never obtrusive, and his accompaniment is unfailingly professional. Though Bromberg dabbles in a number of styles on Use Me, from the country bounce of “Lookout Mountain Girl” to the simmering New Orleans funk of Dr. John’s “You Don’t Want to Make Me Mad,” the album is remarkably consistent, and sounds as though it could have been cut in a single afternoon session.

EDITORS’ NOTES

One of a handful of precocious young guitarists who studied under Reverend Gary Davis in the ‘60’s, David Bromberg is among the select few country-blues revivalists of that era to have an intuitive and unforced relationship with the genre. Like the similarly gifted Ry Cooder, Bromberg has spent much of his career as an in demand session musician, and on Use Me Bromberg solicits contributions from many of the crack songwriters that he has provided musical backing for over the years. Use Me sees Bromberg interpreting songs by Americana luminaries like Guy Clark, Dr. John, John Hiatt and Levon Helm. Bromberg’s readings of these songs are universally genial and relaxed, his guitar playing is masterful but never obtrusive, and his accompaniment is unfailingly professional. Though Bromberg dabbles in a number of styles on Use Me, from the country bounce of “Lookout Mountain Girl” to the simmering New Orleans funk of Dr. John’s “You Don’t Want to Make Me Mad,” the album is remarkably consistent, and sounds as though it could have been cut in a single afternoon session.

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