13 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone wondering how a garage rock band can sustain a career nearly 50 years after that sound had its commercial heyday should look at Atlanta’s Black Lips. They've been staying true to their instincts without losing their identity, 15-plus years since they first turned on the fuzzbox. Over the past decade, they’ve taken their raunchy brand of real rock ’n’ roll to people in all parts of the world. They let their previous album, Arabia Mountain, be manicured by Mark Ronson, while Underneath the Rainbow is produced by several men, including The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney, The Dap Kings’ musical director Tommy Brenneck, and the band’s longtime collaborator Ed Rawls. “Drive-By Buddy” opens sounding like The Monkees’ “Last Train to Clarksville” being played by a better-than-average band on a Nuggets collection. “Smiling” preens like an early Strokes tune, and “Dorner Party” rattles with glorious random imprecision. “Justice After All” further enjoys a primitive approach. The Black Lips let producers make superficial alterations, but the band never lose the heart of their sound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone wondering how a garage rock band can sustain a career nearly 50 years after that sound had its commercial heyday should look at Atlanta’s Black Lips. They've been staying true to their instincts without losing their identity, 15-plus years since they first turned on the fuzzbox. Over the past decade, they’ve taken their raunchy brand of real rock ’n’ roll to people in all parts of the world. They let their previous album, Arabia Mountain, be manicured by Mark Ronson, while Underneath the Rainbow is produced by several men, including The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney, The Dap Kings’ musical director Tommy Brenneck, and the band’s longtime collaborator Ed Rawls. “Drive-By Buddy” opens sounding like The Monkees’ “Last Train to Clarksville” being played by a better-than-average band on a Nuggets collection. “Smiling” preens like an early Strokes tune, and “Dorner Party” rattles with glorious random imprecision. “Justice After All” further enjoys a primitive approach. The Black Lips let producers make superficial alterations, but the band never lose the heart of their sound.

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