9 Songs, 1 Hour 8 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While Ten Years After were one of the finest British blues-rock acts of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, they were initially also very much a jazz-influenced quartet as the extended workout of Woody Herman’s “(At The) Woodchopper’s Ball,” Gershwin’s “Summertime” and the band’s own “I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always” make abundantly clear. These recordings from the tiny London club Klook’s Kleek in May 1968 give a perfect idea what the band’s sets were like in the early days: plenty of improvisation and room for guitarist Alvin Lee to take flight with incredibly intricate solos. “I’m Going Home” would become a classic in the U.S. once it was part of the Woodstock Festival the following year. This “remastered” collection features an extended look at the original album with versions of blues standards such as “Standing At the Crossroads” and “Spoonful” as well as a long meditational take on Al Kooper’s “I Can’t Keep from Crying, Sometimes” that gives you a front row seat to a band quickly coming together.

EDITORS’ NOTES

While Ten Years After were one of the finest British blues-rock acts of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, they were initially also very much a jazz-influenced quartet as the extended workout of Woody Herman’s “(At The) Woodchopper’s Ball,” Gershwin’s “Summertime” and the band’s own “I May Be Wrong, But I Won’t Be Wrong Always” make abundantly clear. These recordings from the tiny London club Klook’s Kleek in May 1968 give a perfect idea what the band’s sets were like in the early days: plenty of improvisation and room for guitarist Alvin Lee to take flight with incredibly intricate solos. “I’m Going Home” would become a classic in the U.S. once it was part of the Woodstock Festival the following year. This “remastered” collection features an extended look at the original album with versions of blues standards such as “Standing At the Crossroads” and “Spoonful” as well as a long meditational take on Al Kooper’s “I Can’t Keep from Crying, Sometimes” that gives you a front row seat to a band quickly coming together.

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