5 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Guru Guru were the wild-eyed madmen of Germany's Krautrock underground in the '70s. In a countercultural scene defined by freakiness, they were the freakiest of the bunch, as their 1970 debut album makes abundantly clear. Though they employed a standard guitar/bass/drums lineup, UFO bears little resemblance to most early-'70s rock recordings. On the three tracks of the album's first half, the band stir up a mostly instrumental, post-psychedelic storm that makes '60s acid rock seem like bubblegum pop. Where the likes of Jimi Hendrix used blues as a base for outward-bound adventures, these tracks seem to use something akin to Hendrix's most outré outings as a jumping-off point; Ax Genrich generates a broader spectrum of tones than one would think possible from a guitar, while bassist Uli Trepte and drummer Mani Neumeier match him every step of the way. The members' background in avant-jazz seems significant in this context and even more so on the last two tracks, where the band basically abandon tonality in favor of pure sound exploration.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Guru Guru were the wild-eyed madmen of Germany's Krautrock underground in the '70s. In a countercultural scene defined by freakiness, they were the freakiest of the bunch, as their 1970 debut album makes abundantly clear. Though they employed a standard guitar/bass/drums lineup, UFO bears little resemblance to most early-'70s rock recordings. On the three tracks of the album's first half, the band stir up a mostly instrumental, post-psychedelic storm that makes '60s acid rock seem like bubblegum pop. Where the likes of Jimi Hendrix used blues as a base for outward-bound adventures, these tracks seem to use something akin to Hendrix's most outré outings as a jumping-off point; Ax Genrich generates a broader spectrum of tones than one would think possible from a guitar, while bassist Uli Trepte and drummer Mani Neumeier match him every step of the way. The members' background in avant-jazz seems significant in this context and even more so on the last two tracks, where the band basically abandon tonality in favor of pure sound exploration.

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