12 Songs, 23 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the opening onslaught of “Go Home,” it’s easy to understand why Ty Segall’s eponymous debut was released on John Dwyer’s Castle Face Records. Much like Dwyer’s band Thee Oh Sees, Segall has a penchant for playing awesomely dirty and stripped-down garage rock trimmed with distorted pawn-shop guitars plugged into the prerequisite vintage Silvertone tube amp while crooning vocal takes recorded so lo-fi that they’re almost no-fi. Segall’s recordings play with a raw and primitive brilliance that allows him to birth tunes that somehow sound simultaneously timeless and new, much like the late great Jay Reatard. “Pretty Baby (You’re So Ugly)” bursts through the garage door with the kind of hyper-active rock ‘n’ roll temper tantrums associated with early Little Richard performances – Segall’s live one-man-band act has him strumming his guitar with reckless abandon while stomping on a kick drum and tambourine configuration. “Oh Mary” perfectly reflects this bare-bones approach; turn up the volume, close your eyes and you’re practically there in the crowd.

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the opening onslaught of “Go Home,” it’s easy to understand why Ty Segall’s eponymous debut was released on John Dwyer’s Castle Face Records. Much like Dwyer’s band Thee Oh Sees, Segall has a penchant for playing awesomely dirty and stripped-down garage rock trimmed with distorted pawn-shop guitars plugged into the prerequisite vintage Silvertone tube amp while crooning vocal takes recorded so lo-fi that they’re almost no-fi. Segall’s recordings play with a raw and primitive brilliance that allows him to birth tunes that somehow sound simultaneously timeless and new, much like the late great Jay Reatard. “Pretty Baby (You’re So Ugly)” bursts through the garage door with the kind of hyper-active rock ‘n’ roll temper tantrums associated with early Little Richard performances – Segall’s live one-man-band act has him strumming his guitar with reckless abandon while stomping on a kick drum and tambourine configuration. “Oh Mary” perfectly reflects this bare-bones approach; turn up the volume, close your eyes and you’re practically there in the crowd.

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