24 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coming a mere year and a half after Tha Carter V freed the Young Money star from years of purgatorial label/legal exile, Funeral dispels any lingering notions that his career wouldn’t recover from the prolonged delay. The 24-track (!) outing bears hallmarks of both Mixtape Weezy and Album Weezy, along with some welcome studio experimentation. On disparate sung tracks like “Sights and Silencers” and “Never Mind,” he shows off more of the range that has rightfully kept him in the G.O.A.T. debate for decades. He doles out cautionary wisdom on the opening title track with voice-cracking urgency, while the pugilistic “Mama Mia” finds his already pliant tone somehow finding strange new registers as he lands his punchlines. He careens purposefully between brighter styles on Funeral as only he can, embracing NOLA bounce on “Clap for Em” and teasing commercial palatability on the intergenerational “I Do It” with Big Sean and Lil Baby. By the end, it’s clear that Lil Wayne has emerged fully from the darkness of the period preceding Tha Carter V, ready to redefine his legacy in the best way possible.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

Coming a mere year and a half after Tha Carter V freed the Young Money star from years of purgatorial label/legal exile, Funeral dispels any lingering notions that his career wouldn’t recover from the prolonged delay. The 24-track (!) outing bears hallmarks of both Mixtape Weezy and Album Weezy, along with some welcome studio experimentation. On disparate sung tracks like “Sights and Silencers” and “Never Mind,” he shows off more of the range that has rightfully kept him in the G.O.A.T. debate for decades. He doles out cautionary wisdom on the opening title track with voice-cracking urgency, while the pugilistic “Mama Mia” finds his already pliant tone somehow finding strange new registers as he lands his punchlines. He careens purposefully between brighter styles on Funeral as only he can, embracing NOLA bounce on “Clap for Em” and teasing commercial palatability on the intergenerational “I Do It” with Big Sean and Lil Baby. By the end, it’s clear that Lil Wayne has emerged fully from the darkness of the period preceding Tha Carter V, ready to redefine his legacy in the best way possible.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

3.9 out of 5
568 Ratings

568 Ratings

Red dead fanboy ,

Ok

Not his best album, but not his worst. Found some bangers and stinkers on here. Lil Wayne, stop mumbling and using auto tune on every god dang song. Your album would have been much better without that and also repeating the same fricking phrases for the fricking chorus of a song. You could’ve been doing some bar heavy type stuff like Eminem and even you did at one time. However, as I said before, its not too bad of an album. I just wish he wouldn’t try to sound and act like all the mumble rappers.

juanoboy ,

Egh

I don’t understand the hype for Lil Wayne. He ain’t wack but I never see anything special from him. Guess it’s just me. 🤷🏽‍♂️

pholly ,

Horrible

Lazy, repetitive garbage.

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