13 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The songbook album tradition reaches way back in American pop. But the usual approach is for the crooner to come in and croon, while the arrangers and conductors and orchestras work behind the scenes. In this case, Harry Connick, Jr., on his debut for Verve Records, arranged and conducted the orchestra himself, and played piano—and, oh yes, sang. His voice is crisp and clean, getting at every nuance in these Porter gems, from the widely known (“Just One of Those Things,” “Begin the Beguine”) to the not terribly common (“Mind If I Make Love to You”). Underneath the crowd-pleasing aesthetic is the work of someone—a native New Orleanian—with high musical standards and authentic jazz cred.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

The songbook album tradition reaches way back in American pop. But the usual approach is for the crooner to come in and croon, while the arrangers and conductors and orchestras work behind the scenes. In this case, Harry Connick, Jr., on his debut for Verve Records, arranged and conducted the orchestra himself, and played piano—and, oh yes, sang. His voice is crisp and clean, getting at every nuance in these Porter gems, from the widely known (“Just One of Those Things,” “Begin the Beguine”) to the not terribly common (“Mind If I Make Love to You”). Underneath the crowd-pleasing aesthetic is the work of someone—a native New Orleanian—with high musical standards and authentic jazz cred.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
41 Ratings

41 Ratings

gortmull ,

Sinatra

This materpiece has Frank Sinatra enblazoned all over it. Mr. Connick takes us back and does it superbly.

Lpveittttttt ,

Ego

Oop

jonny baby ,

True Love: A Celebration Of Cole Porter

Harry Connick, Jr. is one of those outstanding artists that is able to elevate their work to a level above the particular genre they ply their craft. Even if one is not a particular fan of jazz, play a piece from one of the many releases of Connick';s and it makes one stop what they are doing and just listen.

Why then do I find this album leaning toward being a bit less satisfying than his other works?
It certainly is not because of anything less than stellar work by Mr. Connick. Or Mr. Porter!

The album is plagued by a slight but annoying sound of over production. Too many elements with no room for any of the subtle and satisfying individual variations Connick is able to impart to a song.

More By Harry Connick, Jr.