17 Songs, 1 Hour 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Johnny Winter does not appear on the albums or the film of the Woodstock Festival. His impression was only made on the 400,000 who were in attendance and witnessed first-hand his incredibly virtuoso performance of scabrous guitar and potent, jagged vocals. From the onset of J.B. Lenoir’s “Mama, Talk to Your Daughter,” the Texas bluesman pulls out all the stops, ripping through fast, angry guitar lines that feature his unforgiving and biting guitar tone. Balanced between originals such as the ferocious “Mean Town Blues” and “Leland Mississippi Blues,” from his self-titled 1969 debut album, here in re-mastered form, and classic covers such as a ten-minute version of J.D. Loudermilk’s “Tobacco Road” and Chuck Berry’s set-closing “Johnny B. Goode,” Winter’s 65-minute performance is among the festival’s most electrifying. His brother Edgar joins him on keyboards for three tracks, including Bo Diddley’s “I Can’t Stand It,” while six of the nine cuts here are previously unreleased. Nearly 15 minutes of “You Done Lost Your Good Thing Now” really brings out the “extended” aspect of the slow blues jam.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Johnny Winter does not appear on the albums or the film of the Woodstock Festival. His impression was only made on the 400,000 who were in attendance and witnessed first-hand his incredibly virtuoso performance of scabrous guitar and potent, jagged vocals. From the onset of J.B. Lenoir’s “Mama, Talk to Your Daughter,” the Texas bluesman pulls out all the stops, ripping through fast, angry guitar lines that feature his unforgiving and biting guitar tone. Balanced between originals such as the ferocious “Mean Town Blues” and “Leland Mississippi Blues,” from his self-titled 1969 debut album, here in re-mastered form, and classic covers such as a ten-minute version of J.D. Loudermilk’s “Tobacco Road” and Chuck Berry’s set-closing “Johnny B. Goode,” Winter’s 65-minute performance is among the festival’s most electrifying. His brother Edgar joins him on keyboards for three tracks, including Bo Diddley’s “I Can’t Stand It,” while six of the nine cuts here are previously unreleased. Nearly 15 minutes of “You Done Lost Your Good Thing Now” really brings out the “extended” aspect of the slow blues jam.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

Jb1954 ,

WHAT A GIFT AFTER ALL THESE YEARS!!

First of all, forget the first CD. You know it, you love it and that's that. BUT...The Woodstock CD....damn, most people didn't even know he played there, but to finally hear what he was doing in 1969, LIVE, was absolutely among the best takes I've heard JW do! It's fresh, it's gritty and it's the best white-man playing the blues EVER. His guitar work sizzles as always and his vocals are just superb. Johnny is not one of those musicians who needs to stay in a studio. His talent is live and it's right on. To hear what my contemporaries heard in rural NY in 1969 is now my treat and it's as good as it gets. I LOVE "new old" stuff like this. Simply amazing.

muzikman97 ,

Johnny and His Band Cook On This Set!

I am very impressed with this set in its entirety and the first Winter studio recording is an eye opener for this long time fan. They are both classic blues rock performances that remain nearly unrivaled. If you want to hear some sick slide guitar check out “Mean Town Blues”, it does not get any better. I also really appreciated how Johnny let Edgar step into the spotlight for a while to show off his versatility on the keyboards and sax on “I Can’t Stand It.” You get a glimpse of another outstanding career that was emerging listening to the classic “Tobacco Road” featuring Edgar on vocals. Edgar would record this song on his debut Entrance in 1970. Johnny introduces the song and mentions to the crowd that they have one album out and recently started working with Edgar and don’t have much material, and that the track was something they used to do as a jam song. And indeed it is, it showcases the Winter brothers playing and singing right on key and a band that is rolling down the tracks letting nothing get in the way.

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck

shanikka1 ,

Completely Blown Away!

I have been a worshipper of Woodstock and its soundtrack since I was an 8-year old child (too young to go to Bethel in '69, dangit.) How could the original compilers have overlooked this brilliant performance in all the anthologies all these years? Previously all I knew of the Winter brothers was Edgar's Frankenstein, which is utter crap compared to the brilliant blues that Johnny Winter (and Edgar too - Tobacco Road ROCKS) played at Woodstock. I first heard these tracks this 40th anniversary weekend thanks only to Sirius/XM. Needless to say, I woke up first thing this morning to buy. Few performances have really challenged my sense of what music was at that time before. White boys in the 1960's playing the blues? And playing it WELL? Inconceivable!!! (And a joy to discover and experience, even this late in the game.)

This is a must buy for lovers of the Blues - even those who might not otherwise consider themselves lovers of the cultural experience which was Woodstock.

(Now, if someone can just come to their senses and do a similar compilation for Richie Havens' set at Woodstock? My mustical life would be complete.)

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