11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nine albums in, the Cali rockers get political with a blistering dispatch from a paranoid world. Drone warfare (on high-concept onslaught “Death From Above”), Edward Snowden (the pleasingly thrashy “Whistleblower”), and Capitol Hill profiteers (exhilarating war cry “Blood on the Sand”) all jostle for room on a bustling record that bubbles over with ideas and Riley Breckenridge’s distinctive thunderous drumming. Thankfully, you don’t need to be a foreign policy expert to savour the monumental thrill of riffy centerpiece “Black Honey”.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nine albums in, the Cali rockers get political with a blistering dispatch from a paranoid world. Drone warfare (on high-concept onslaught “Death From Above”), Edward Snowden (the pleasingly thrashy “Whistleblower”), and Capitol Hill profiteers (exhilarating war cry “Blood on the Sand”) all jostle for room on a bustling record that bubbles over with ideas and Riley Breckenridge’s distinctive thunderous drumming. Thankfully, you don’t need to be a foreign policy expert to savour the monumental thrill of riffy centerpiece “Black Honey”.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
337 Ratings

337 Ratings

FeelTheMusic1537 ,

Dirty

I use that word "dirty" in the best way. From the guitar tones and vocals, to the cymbals- it all sounds gritty, dirty, and in your face. Add that on top of well written songs, and you've got the new thrice record. I love it.

PancakeShrapnel ,

Together We'll Fight the Long Defeat

It's not every day your favorite band emerges from a four year hiatus with what could potentially be your favorite record in their phenomenal discography. This album is massive. It is equal parts adventurous and earnest, reprimanding and consoling, crushingly heavy and breathtakingly beautiful, innovative and disciplined, and most certainly mature. Dustin's lyrics seem stronger than ever and are just as cohesive as the music itself. In a culture of individuals so easily disillusioned, divided, deceived, and distanced from one another, this album's themes must be heeded: to be everywhere is to be nowhere. What an amazing journey it is to be a fan of this band that continues to push themselves creatively. Thanks a million, Thrice.

Muddavugga ,

To be Gone briefly is Better than to Fade for Good

Depending on what it is you like about Thrice, and when you got into them, will likely determine how much you like this record. Thrice is sadly pigeonholed into a genre because of their earlier records. And while those records are great, they certainly don't define the band.

Thrice had its MTV moments with The Artist in the Ambulance but as quickly as MTV became a channel no one recognized, so did this band. They made a detour or artistic proportions with Vheissu, which like many, at first threw me off guard. However, after giving it a chance and allowing it to simply be a new record and sound for the band rather than be what I expected it to be, I discovered that I LOVED it.

They continued down that path with some really great artistic moves that didn't necessarily keep all their fans along for the ride. However, I was one of those that began to see that this band was more interested in making music rather than being rock stars.... oh wait... you mean the real reason we think bands should be making music? How dare you complain...

Of course, at the end of the day, did they make good records? Well, in my opinion: Yes. The Alchemy
Index had not only a great concept and delivery, it had some great songs.

Then Beggars, which had some of their best songs, IMO and Major / Minor which for me wasn't my favorite, but was still a solid release... but also I think really showed signs of a band that could probably benefit from a little break... Let's call it a hiatus.

Then 5 years later, we have To Be Everywhere is to be Nowhere (which for those of you don't know, this is based on a quote from Roman philosopher, Seneca).

The first thing I noticed is the immediacy of the new songs. This record very much reminds me of Beggars in its execution and style. But by no means, is this a retread. The single Black Honey really says it all. Dustin Kensrue has one of the most unique and recognizable voices in music. And is there anything his voice can't do??

This new record definitely isn't their most experimental but it is definitely a strong record of great songs. And it probably one of their heaviest, since TAITA.

Welcome back, Thrice. Thanks for not overthinking it, or dumbing it down. But rather just making a good rock record for those that haven't yet lost hope that rock can still be a valued currency in the economy of crappy music everyone else seems to be listening to.

More By Thrice

You May Also Like