19 Songs, 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

John le Carré’s 1974 spy novel Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy was adapted for a BBC miniseries in the late '70s. In 2011, Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) helmed a version for the big screen. Alberto Iglesias—who has written music for several Pedro Almodovar films and received Academy Award nominations for his work on The Constant Gardener and The Kite Runner—scored the feature release. “George Smiley” opens; in the movie, Gary Oldman plays Smiley, a forcibly retired intelligence agent who's called back to action. Jazzy drums and strings accompany trumpet; later, harp and chugging strings back up oboe. With its pizzicato lines, “Circus” exudes mystery, while “One’s Gone” bristles with edgy percussion and electric guitar shadings. “Karla,” a wisp of a piece, creates a reflective mood with a handful of notes. The closing title cut starts with solo piano before shimmering strings rise and orchestral drama ensues. Later, the piece quiets and drifts away: it’s a suitable ending to a score that remains subtle throughout.

EDITORS’ NOTES

John le Carré’s 1974 spy novel Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy was adapted for a BBC miniseries in the late '70s. In 2011, Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) helmed a version for the big screen. Alberto Iglesias—who has written music for several Pedro Almodovar films and received Academy Award nominations for his work on The Constant Gardener and The Kite Runner—scored the feature release. “George Smiley” opens; in the movie, Gary Oldman plays Smiley, a forcibly retired intelligence agent who's called back to action. Jazzy drums and strings accompany trumpet; later, harp and chugging strings back up oboe. With its pizzicato lines, “Circus” exudes mystery, while “One’s Gone” bristles with edgy percussion and electric guitar shadings. “Karla,” a wisp of a piece, creates a reflective mood with a handful of notes. The closing title cut starts with solo piano before shimmering strings rise and orchestral drama ensues. Later, the piece quiets and drifts away: it’s a suitable ending to a score that remains subtle throughout.

TITLE TIME

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