11 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“This album is a concept record,” frontman Dan Smith explains to Apple Music’s Zane Lowe. “We’re telling the course of a night out during the apocalypse.” The pop quartet begins with the giddy expectations of “Quarter Past Midnight” and hurtles toward the booze-fueled euphoria of “Million Pieces” before morning breaks and a text from a crush on the upbeat “Joy” ends the party—and the album.

“When you try and do something that’s different and creative—particularly in the environment at the moment with people being obsessed with single songs—it’s so nice to double down and care about those songs but really think about a record and a narrative,” says Smith. Their third album brings together the skyscraping choruses of debut Bad Blood, electronic experimentation of follow-up Wild World, and gospel singers from their 2018 ReOrchestrated UK tour in a dizzying reflection of the turbulent times we live in.

These elements come together spectacularly on the saxophone-powered “Those Nights.” “We wanted to write something about that point in the night when you’re craving human contact and create something woozy and beautiful,” says Smith. The quartet’s drums replicate “that moment just before the night blurs out into oblivion.” Doom Days addresses social anxiety (“The Waves”), phone addiction (“Doom Days”), excess (“Nocturnal Creatures”), and political apathy (“Million Pieces”), but the Londoners are confident that redemption can be found in human interaction and a good party.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“This album is a concept record,” frontman Dan Smith explains to Apple Music’s Zane Lowe. “We’re telling the course of a night out during the apocalypse.” The pop quartet begins with the giddy expectations of “Quarter Past Midnight” and hurtles toward the booze-fueled euphoria of “Million Pieces” before morning breaks and a text from a crush on the upbeat “Joy” ends the party—and the album.

“When you try and do something that’s different and creative—particularly in the environment at the moment with people being obsessed with single songs—it’s so nice to double down and care about those songs but really think about a record and a narrative,” says Smith. Their third album brings together the skyscraping choruses of debut Bad Blood, electronic experimentation of follow-up Wild World, and gospel singers from their 2018 ReOrchestrated UK tour in a dizzying reflection of the turbulent times we live in.

These elements come together spectacularly on the saxophone-powered “Those Nights.” “We wanted to write something about that point in the night when you’re craving human contact and create something woozy and beautiful,” says Smith. The quartet’s drums replicate “that moment just before the night blurs out into oblivion.” Doom Days addresses social anxiety (“The Waves”), phone addiction (“Doom Days”), excess (“Nocturnal Creatures”), and political apathy (“Million Pieces”), but the Londoners are confident that redemption can be found in human interaction and a good party.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
136 Ratings

136 Ratings

Knight3353 ,

Concept to reality; Bastille brings the thunder again.

Capturing the angst of the apocalyptic undertones of the modern landscape, the bands mainline entry into their discography with “Doom Days” captures a frame perfect Friday night for most twenty-something’s.

It feels oddly to succinct for a band that brought us such hefty albums in the past, which albeit bipolar in arrangement, felt more personal than something so linear like this album offers the listener.

It’s lovely to hear Dan croon over the tracks, wonderfully dark and woefully dream like (the end creeping from start to finish) with the themes feeling decadent; almost too much, but always just enough to take you from track to track without feeling too heavy. Fire and forget, press play and indulge.

Fans will follow themes from their lesser known release of the mix tape “Other Peoples Heartache Pt. 4” and find a beautiful response to the call of “Warmth” from their last full length album “Wild World” on the aforementioned EP, but it holds the hand of this album like father and son.

We’ve closed our eyes, and fans should take note that this feels like nothing has changed at all; it’s the same Bastille we know and love just framed through a different lense.

All of these songs belong on the mighty pantheon these talented boys have built.

dmarysunflower ,

Bastille is back

As a long time Bastille fan, I am so glad that "soon" is finally here. "Doom Days" offers a more classic Bastille sound, less experimental than "Wild World" and reminiscent of "Bad Blood" days. There's a mix of dance, upbeat tracks and ballads. Stand out tracks: Divide, Another Place, and Those Nights.

galactico12 ,

A Masterpiece. An album that will transcend time.

This album is simply incredible. Every song is so good and fresh. Bastille have done it again, and this one will be remembered for a very long time.

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