14 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Wesley Harding's songs have always had a literary intensity. It’s led him into the publishing world, where he wrote three books under his given name, Wesley Stace. And it’s kept his wit plenty sharp. “There’s a Starbucks (Where the Starbucks Used To Be)” has the biting irony of Randy Newman shoring up pitch-perfect observations about the 21st century. “I Might Be Dead” features ghostly Beach Boys–style backing vocals and buckling Neil Young-esque guitars accompanying a melody worthy of Magical Mystery Tour-era Beatles. “I Should Have Stopped” has the piano lope of the kind of early-'70s pop tune that Ben Folds has chased his entire career. “The World in Song” is a haunting epic that travels through space and time to come up with a tune that unpeels like layers of an onion. “Calling Off the Experiment” checks in with an excited new wave gait. “Gentleman Caller” sounds like Harding’s been listening to his Kinks records.

EDITORS’ NOTES

John Wesley Harding's songs have always had a literary intensity. It’s led him into the publishing world, where he wrote three books under his given name, Wesley Stace. And it’s kept his wit plenty sharp. “There’s a Starbucks (Where the Starbucks Used To Be)” has the biting irony of Randy Newman shoring up pitch-perfect observations about the 21st century. “I Might Be Dead” features ghostly Beach Boys–style backing vocals and buckling Neil Young-esque guitars accompanying a melody worthy of Magical Mystery Tour-era Beatles. “I Should Have Stopped” has the piano lope of the kind of early-'70s pop tune that Ben Folds has chased his entire career. “The World in Song” is a haunting epic that travels through space and time to come up with a tune that unpeels like layers of an onion. “Calling Off the Experiment” checks in with an excited new wave gait. “Gentleman Caller” sounds like Harding’s been listening to his Kinks records.

TITLE TIME

More By John Wesley Harding

You May Also Like