14 Songs, 1 Hour 6 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following the release of his eponymous debut, accolades orbited around Brett Dennen's androgynous voice — he soulfully inflects like Billie Holiday, Chet Baker, and Tracy Chapman. But where his debut exuded a sunny and playful vibe (right down to the watercolor album art that could've been painted by a children's storybook illustrator), the memorable parts of Dennen's sophomore album move more pensively with lyrics that reflect on the turbulent times of the George W. Bush administration. The aptly titled So Much More delivers on the title, diving deeper into troubled waters and surfacing with stronger songs about topics like dishonest politicians, unnecessary wars, ignored disasters, and poverty. In the opening folk-rocker "Ain't No Reason," Dennen touches on sweatshop labor, a.k.a. "slavery stitched into the fabric of my clothes." The title track refers to the outcome of the 2004 presidential election: "When I heard the news my heart fell on the floor/ I was on a plane on my way to Baltimore." Dennen even calls for a revolution in "I Asked When," the most poignant and political song here. But throughout So Much More, he manages to speak his mind and sing his heart out, keeping protest folk alive, mature, and enjoyable without standing on a soapbox.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following the release of his eponymous debut, accolades orbited around Brett Dennen's androgynous voice — he soulfully inflects like Billie Holiday, Chet Baker, and Tracy Chapman. But where his debut exuded a sunny and playful vibe (right down to the watercolor album art that could've been painted by a children's storybook illustrator), the memorable parts of Dennen's sophomore album move more pensively with lyrics that reflect on the turbulent times of the George W. Bush administration. The aptly titled So Much More delivers on the title, diving deeper into troubled waters and surfacing with stronger songs about topics like dishonest politicians, unnecessary wars, ignored disasters, and poverty. In the opening folk-rocker "Ain't No Reason," Dennen touches on sweatshop labor, a.k.a. "slavery stitched into the fabric of my clothes." The title track refers to the outcome of the 2004 presidential election: "When I heard the news my heart fell on the floor/ I was on a plane on my way to Baltimore." Dennen even calls for a revolution in "I Asked When," the most poignant and political song here. But throughout So Much More, he manages to speak his mind and sing his heart out, keeping protest folk alive, mature, and enjoyable without standing on a soapbox.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
210 Ratings

210 Ratings

annaj0408 ,

So Much More than a "Jack Johnson Alternative"

This man is definitely an original troubador, though you'll hear his music reminiscing on Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, and Joni Mitchell. He's got a honeysuckle voice, lovely melodies, beautiful rythms, and very real talent. The lyrics (poems that can stand alone) are personally and politically potent, making the heart behind them sleeve-worn and available to listeners. Meet the guy in person and he's much more protective of himself, probably a wise move for a man who continues to put raw thoughts and emotion into the public sphere. Listen, and let it do what music does at its best-- make things shift deep within you, inspiring change and creations you can call your own.

thiscity ,

Exceptional.

I've never written a review but, this album is unlike anything I've ever heard. Brett's ability to create thoughtful, fearless, clear music is unmatched in today's music industry. This album changed the way I look at the world.

Carol5309 ,

This album is "mine"

I love the song "shes mine" it is awesome and this album is great....!!! i suggest it to anyone who likes to listen to the purity and lyrics to a song!

More By Brett Dennen

You May Also Like