15 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Sonet Blues Story comprises recordings that Snooks Eaglin made in June 1971. At that time, he was leading his own band on New Orleans' club circuit, where he entertained tourists and locals alike. These tracks highlight Eaglin’s ability to get the party started. He's neither a blues singer nor an R&B crooner but a distinctive hybrid. Even if you knew nothing about Eaglin, you could probably immediately identify these as indigenous Louisiana dance tunes. It’s there in the Second Line drumming of “Travelling Mood” and “Let the Four Winds Blow,” plus in the zydeco underpinnings of “Down Yonder,” in which Eaglin’s guitar solo adopts the tone of an accordion. For all the zest of these performances, Eaglin handles them with a rare sincerity and effortlessness. New Orleans is well known for its sharp musical stylings, but where other performers might veer into shtick, Eaglin is always sincere and never strained. He epitomizes New Orleans cool.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Sonet Blues Story comprises recordings that Snooks Eaglin made in June 1971. At that time, he was leading his own band on New Orleans' club circuit, where he entertained tourists and locals alike. These tracks highlight Eaglin’s ability to get the party started. He's neither a blues singer nor an R&B crooner but a distinctive hybrid. Even if you knew nothing about Eaglin, you could probably immediately identify these as indigenous Louisiana dance tunes. It’s there in the Second Line drumming of “Travelling Mood” and “Let the Four Winds Blow,” plus in the zydeco underpinnings of “Down Yonder,” in which Eaglin’s guitar solo adopts the tone of an accordion. For all the zest of these performances, Eaglin handles them with a rare sincerity and effortlessness. New Orleans is well known for its sharp musical stylings, but where other performers might veer into shtick, Eaglin is always sincere and never strained. He epitomizes New Orleans cool.

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